Scottish proverbs

Scottish proverbs translated to English and Catalan

Previously on Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet we posted the most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English. A saying is a short, pithy, commonly known expression which generally offers advice or wisdom, and contains truth or value. As everybody knows, Scotland is a beautiful country full of history and folk wisdom. So without further ado, let’s take a look at some delightful Scottish proverbs:

Glasgow from Queen’s Park.

Like father, like son

Scottish Gaelic: Am mac mar an t-athair.
Catalan: De tal pare, tal fill.

Nobody can serve two masters

Scottish Gaelic: Chan urrainn do dhuine ‘sambith seirbhis a dhéanamh do dhà mhaighstir.
Catalan: Ningú pot servir a dos senyors. (literally, Nobody can serve two lords).

A leopard can’t change its spots

Scottish Gaelic: an car a bha san t-seana mhaide ‘s duilich a thoirt às (literally, the twist which is in the old stick is difficult to take out).
Catalan: Cabra avesada a saltar, fa de mal desvesar (literally, A goat used to jump is difficult to unveil).

Every cloud has a silver lining

Scottish Gaelic: tha a’ ghrian air cùlaibh gach sgothan (literally, The sun is behind each boat).
Catalan: Es tanca una porta i s’obre una finestra (literally, a door closes and a window opens) or No hi ha mal que per bé no vingui (literally, there is no evil that does not come for a good purpose).

He who loses his language loses his world

Scottish Gaelic: Am fear a chailleas a chanain caillidh e a shaoghal.
Translation into Catalan: Qui perd el seu idioma, perd el seu món.

It is the milk of the goat foaming and warm, that gave the strength to the past generations of people

Scottish Gaelic: Bainne nan gobhar fo chobhar ’s e blàth, ’s e chuireadh an spionnadh sna daoine a bha
Catalan: És la llet escumosa i calenta de la cabra, la que va donar força a les anteriors generacions.

Do you know any other Scottish proverbs? Tell us! We look forward to your comments and suggestions.

Big fish eat little fish

Scottish Gaelic: A’ bhiast as mutha ag ithe na beiste as lugha.

Catalan: el peix gran es menja el petit.

Although…

What’s meant to happen will happen

Scottish: Whit’s fur ye’ll no go by ye! 

Catalan: El que hagi de passar, passarà.

Many a little makes a mickle

Scottish: Mony a mickle maks a muckle! (Saving a small amount soon builds up to a large amount)

Catalan: De mica en mica s’omple la pica.

Edinburgh
Edinburgh

Don’t try to teach someone something they already know

Scottish: Dinnae teach yer Granny tae suck eggs! 

Catalan: No vulguis ensenyar res a algú que ja en sap.

Thank you for your visit. Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

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That’s a different kettle of fish

Idioms ~That’s a different kettle of fish in other languages

Meaning

(to) be a different kettle of fish refers to a topic or situation which is enterily different from the one that was just being discussed. Synonym: It’s a horse of a different color.

That's a different kettle of fish
It's a horse of a different color
It's a horse of a different color

Examples

… I suppose we could organize a party, but that’s an entirely different kettle of fish, we were discussing about the impact of the economic crisis on the labour market.

However, MPs are something of a different kettle of fish to the MEPs in my view.

That’s a different kettle of fish in Catalan

In Catalan there is the idiom Són figues d’un altre paner (literally, These are figs from another basket).

That's a different kettle of fish in Catalan
idioms

That’s a different kettle of fish in French

In French, the closest equivalent is Une autre paire de manches (literally, another pair of sleeves).

That's a different kettle of fish in French
That’s a different kettle of fish in French: c’est une autre paire de manches.

That’s a different kettle of fish in German

In German it is ein ganz anderes Para Schuhe (literally, These are another pair of shoes).

That's a different kettle of fish in German

That’s a different kettle of fish in Italian

Depending on the context, there are 3 versions in Italian, namely, la cosa cambia aspetto (literally, the thing changes of aspect) , è un altro paio di maniche (literally, that’s another pair of sleeves) o questo è ben altro affare (literally, That’s a completey different matter).

That's a different kettle of fish in Italian

That’s a different kettle of fish in Spanish

In Spanish there is the idiom Eso es harina de otro costal (literally, this is flour from another sack/bag).

That's a different kettle of fish in Spanish

Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

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Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle

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Scottish Gaelic ⇆ Catalan Simple Greetings

Scots gaelic and Catalan greetings

Greetings in Scots Gaelic and Catalan

Here is a list of the main greetings in Scots Gaelic translated to Catalan language. Scottish Gaelic is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic. One curious fact about Scots Gaelic Gaelic is that it has no words for “yes” (in Catalan, ) and “no” (in Catalan, No), and replies are made with the relevant verbs. For questions beginning with “a bheil?”, the appropriate word for “yes” is “tha”. An alternative is “seadh”, pronounced shugh, which means “yeah” or “uh-huh”. At the end of this post there is a comprehensive list of resources to learn Scottish Gaelic or Catalan.

English > Scots Gaelic (pronunciation) ⇆ Catalan (audio)

Hello > Halò. (ha-LAW) ⇆ Hola

Welcome > fàilte – (faaltshæ) Benvingut

My name is [your name]> Is mise … [your name] ⇆ En dic… [your name]

How are you? > Ciamar a tha thu/sibh? (KEM-mer uh HA oo?) ⇆ Com estàs?

Good morning > madainn mhath (matin vah) ⇆ Bon dia

Good day > latha math (laah mah) ⇆ Bon dia

Good afternoon/evening > feashar math – (fesker mah) ⇆ Bona tarda / vespre

Good night > oidhche mhath – (oychæ vah) ⇆ Bona nit

Bye for now > tiaraidh an dràsda (tsheearee an draasha)Fins ara!

Goodbye > beannachd leibh (byannachk leyv) ⇆ Adéu

Excuse me > gabh mo leisgeul (gav mo leshæl)Perdoni

I am sorry > tha mi duilich (haa mee doolich)Perdó

Thank you > tapadh leibh (tah leyv)Gràcies / Mercès

Many thanks > mòran taing (mohræn tigh -ng)Moltes gràcies

You’re welcome ( Reply to thank you ) > ´s e ur beatha (shey oor behah) ⇆ De res

Gaelic> Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlɪkʲ]  ⇆ Gaèlic · Catalan > Catalanach ⇆ Català

Recommended posts:

Catalan flags
Catalan Catalonia independence flags
Catalunya
Catalan flags explained
Catalan sayings
Catalan Proverbs
Sayings and proverbs in Catalan
Most important Catalan sayings

Scottish Gaelic learners’ materials on the Internet:

Adhartach (Advanced)

  • Clilstore – Videos of authentic and natural (while also clear and relatively simple) conversations with fluent Gaelic speakers, including a transcript with all words linked to online dictionaries
  • BBC Alba iplayer
  • Language Skills – Online literacy for fluent speakers – Course by SCIR, Lews Castle College, on Gaelic Orthographic Conventions
  • Stòras na Gàidhlig aig Foghlam Alba
  • An t-Oide – blog WordPress aig Steaphan MacRisnidh

Dictionaries

Supplements to particular textbooks (Advanced)

E-books – $

Catalan learners’ materials on the Internet:

Intercat

Information about Catalan

Courses and lessons

Gamified lessons & Flashcards(most sites here have mobile apps)

Online dictionaries

Catalan monolingual

Translators

Verb conjugation

Pronunciation


Maps & Images

Interactive Dialect/Pronunciation/Accent maps


MediaOnline radio

Audio

Podcasts

TV

Videos

Films

Anime

You can normally find Catalan dubs of popular anime on YouTube if you search “title + catala”, but they’re frequently removed due to Copyright restriction, so the below links may not work forever.

Songs


TextOnline News

Literature

Comics

Misc

Information on Catalancheck out the ca.wikipedia.org versions of the pages!

Tapadh leibh, Gràcies!

Thank you and see you soon!

Most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions

Top Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English

Here is a list of the most important and widespread Catalan Sayings and proverbs, which are sentences that convey the collective wisdom of our forefathers and have been passed down to successive generations over the years. While a saying is a familiar expression that is often repeated, a proverb is a type of saying that contains a piece of advice or simply contains truth or a value. We will provide a literal, word-by-word, translation as well as the closest equivalent saying and proverb in English and French. There is an audio recording of every expression too, so that you can learn how to pronounce them.

Qui no s’arrisca, no pisca

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
Nothing ventured, nothing lost pronunciation in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: He who doesn’t take risks, doesn’t grab (anything).

English closest equivalent: Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

🍀🍀🍀🍀🍀🍀

Com més serem, més riurem

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
The more the merrier in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: The more we will be, the more we will laugh.

English equivalent: The more, the merrier.

🧑🏿‍🤝‍🧑🏿🧑‍🤝‍🧑🧑🏻‍🤝‍🧑🏽 🧑🏿‍🤝‍🧑🏿🧑‍🤝‍🧑🧑🏻‍🤝‍🧑🏽

A poc a poc i bona lletra ✪

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
The more haste, the less speed in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: slowly and neat handwriting.

English equivalent: The more haste, the worse speed / More haste, less speed.

✍✍✍✍✍ ✍

De mica en mica, s’omple la pica

Many a little, makes a little in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: Bit by bit, one fills the sink.

English equivalents (depending on the context): Many a little makes a mickle, Take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves or Constant dripping wears away the stone. In French: Petit à petit, loiseau fait son nid (literally, little by little the bird makes its nest).

🚰🚰🚰🚰🚰🚰

Si vols estar ben servit, fes-te tu mateix el llit

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
If you want something done right, do it yourself pronunciation in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: If you want to be well served, make the bed yourself.

English equivalent: If you want something done right, do it yourself.

🛏️ 🛏️ 🛏️ 🛏️ 🛏️ 🛏️

Els catalans, de les pedres en fem pans

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
Catalans make bread out of stones pronunciation

Literal translation: Catalans make bread out of stones.

Meaning: Catalan people get ahead in spite of difficulties because they are productive and can make a virtue out of necessity.

🍞🍞🍞🍞🍞🍞

Hi ha més dies que llonganisses

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
There’s plenty of time in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: there are more days than sausages. (llonganisa is a speciality cold sausage with spiced pork filling and intestine skins).

English equivalent: There’s plenty of time.

🥖🥖🥖🥖🥖🥖

Al pot petit hi ha la bona confitura

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
Good things come in small packages in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: In the small jar there is the good jam.

English equivalent: Good things come in small packages.

🏺🏺🏺🏺🏺🏺

Tal faràs, tal trobaràs

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
What goes around comes around in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: Such you will do, such you will find.

English equivalent: What goes around, comes around.

🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏

No diguis blat fins que no el tinguis al sac i ben lligat

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched in Catalan, English and French

Literal meaning: Don’t say wheat until you have it in the bag and well tied up.

English equivalent: Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched.

🌾🌾🌾🌾🌾🌾

Honorific mentions

✪ Qui de jove no treballa, de vell dorm a la palla ✪

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language, French sayings, French idioms
If you lie upon roses when young, you will lie upon thorns when old in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: He who doesn’t work when young, will sleep on the straw when old.

English equivalent: If you lie upon roses when young, you will lie upon thorns when old.

👷👩‍💼🧑🏿‍🏭 👷👩‍💼🧑🏿‍🏭

Cel rogent, pluja o vent

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
Red sky at night, sailor’s delight. Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning closest equivalents in Catalan, English and French

English closest equivalent: Red sky at night, sailor’s delight. Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning.

Literal meaning: Reddish sky, rain or wind.

French closest equivalent: Ciel rouge le soir laisse bon espoir. Ciel rouge le matin, pluie en chemin.

🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥

A l’estiu, tota cuca viu

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
Sayings about summer in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: In summertime, every bug comes alive.

We haven’t found any equivalent for this saying, but here is this one: Friends, sun, sand, and sea, that sounds like a summer to me. It also conveys the liveliness inherent in summertime.

🐛🐞🦗🦟 🐛🐞🦗🦟

Qui no vulgui pols, que no vagi a l’era

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen in Catalan, English and French

Literal meaning: If you don’t want dust, don’t go to the threshing floor.

English closest equivalent: If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. French closest equivalent: Qui craint le danger ne doit pas aller en mer (literally, He who is afraid of danger, shouldn’t go to the sea)

☠️☠️☠️☠️☠️☠️

Per Nadal, cada ovella al seu corral

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
All hearts come home for Christmas in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: At Christmas, every sheep to its yard.

English closest equivalent: All hearts come home for Christmas

French closest equivalent: Tout le monde devrait être à la maison pour Noël (Everybody should be at home for Christmas)

🐑🐏 🐑🐏 🐑🐏

Qui dia passa, any empeny

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
Tomorrow is another day in Catalan, English and French

Literal translation: He who a day passes by, pushes a year.
Closest equivalent in English: Tomorrow is another day .
Closest equivalent in French: Demain est un autre jour.

🗓️🗓️🗓️🗓️🗓️🗓️🗓️

Qui no té memòria, ha de tenir cames

Catalan Sayings, Catalan proverbs, Catalan expressions, Catalan proverbs in English, Catalan sayings in English, Proverbs in Catalan, Sayings in Catalan language
One would forget one’s head if it weren’t screwed on in Catalan

Literal meaning: He who doesn’t have (a good) memory, needs legs.
Closest equivalent in English: One would forget one’s head if it weren’t screwed on.

🏃‍♀️🏃‍♀️🏃‍♀️🏃‍♀️🏃‍♀️🏃‍♀️

Pagant Sant Pere canta

Money talks
Maney talks in Catalan, English and French

Literal meaning: If you pay, Saint Peter sings.
English closest equivalent: Money talks.
French closest equivalent: L’argent a le dernier mot (literally, money has the last word).

💰💰💰💰💰💰

De més verdes en maduren

Stranger things have happened in Catalan, English and French

Literally: Even greener ones have ripened
Closest equivalent in English: Stranger things have happened.
Closest equivalent in French: De drôles de choses se sont passées (literally, stranger things have happened)

👽👽👽👽👽👽

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Common British English expressions translated to Catalan I

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The ‘best’ British insults

Genuine British insults translated to Catalan language

Top 10 most creative and genuine British insults translated to Catalan

Apologies for the rude subject matter, but we were just curious about the most creative and genuine insults in British English and how they translate to Catalan language. This post is not aimed at equipping people with more ways of being rude. It is for linguistic and cultural purposes only. If you don’t like reading swears, just don’t read this post. Needless to say, It’s your decision what ends up coming out of your mouth 🙂 So here is a list of the most creative and genuine British Insults and its closer equivalents in Catalan. This blog is against any sort of censorship. Without freedom of speech there is no debate, no new ideas and therefore, no social progress.

Tosser – Supreme Asshole or jerk. In catalan, Imbècil.

Tosser

Wanker = Idiot. In catalan, idiota. (to) wank [colloq.] [vul.], as a verb for masturbate, is, in Catalan language, “fer-se una palla”.

No oil painting = Ugly. In catalan, cardo.

No oil painting
No oil painting

(to have a face) like a bulldog chewing a wasp = Ugly. In catalan, Més lleig/lletja que un pecat.

No oil painting, like a bulldog chewing a wasp, ugly, like a  back end of a bus

(to have a face) like the back end of a bus = Ugly. In catalan, Més lleig/lletja que un pecat.

Slag = whore, the worst kind . In catalan, putot.

Cunt is one of the most offensive insult in British English. It actually refers to the female genital organ. It is an offensive word for a very unpleasant or unlikable person: You stupid cunt! In Catalan it can be translated as cony (although in Catalan sounds way milder).

Scrubber – A nicer way to say slag . In catalan, fresca.

Cheese eating surrender monkeys = The French. In Catalan gavatxos.

Daft Cow = dumb, large woman. In catalan, tros de foca, vaca.

A big girl’s blouse = A weak cowardly man (It’s somewhat sexist). In catalan, un nyicris, un calçasses.

A big girl's blouse

Arsehole = asshole. In catalan, capsigrany.

Arsehole

Barmy – Stupid or crazy. In catalan, pallús.

Barmy

Two sandwiches short of a picnic = crazy, silly*. In catalan, ximple.

Not the sharpest tool in the box / shed = stupid. In catalan, una mica justet.

Northern monkey = person from the north of the UK. There is no equivalent in Catalan.

Northern monkey
Southern softies

Southern softies = person from the south of the UK. There is no equivalent in Catalan.

Dead from the neck up = stupid. In Catalan, curt/a de gambals.

Dull as dishwater / Ditchwater = boring. In catalan, un plasta (person), un conyàs (thing).

Mad as a box of frogs = Crazy. In Catalan, tocat del bolet, com un llum, com una cabra.

Mad as a box of frogs

Git = Moron, Idiot. In Catalan, idiota.

(Place) is the armpit of (place) = somewhere is the worst place of a bigger place. In Catalan, la claveguera de….

Chav = White Trash / Low Class (both for femenine and masculine) . In Catalan, neng o xoni.

Chav
British chav

Piss Off = Go Away . In Catalan, ves a la merda, fot el camp.

Piss Off

Bell End = Dick Head (bell end also means penis). In Catalan, cabró, imbècil. If it refers to the male genital organ , polla.

Knob = Dick . In Catalan, polla.

Arse-licker = A sycophant . In Catalan, llepa-culs.

Gannet = Greedy person. In Catalan, garrepa, del puny estret.

Plug-Ugly = Very Ugly person. In Catalan, Lleig com una mala cosa.

Milder words (Generally of little concern): Arse, bloody, bugger, cow, crap, damn, ginger, git, Goddam, minger, sod-off

Medium words: Arsehole, balls, bint, bitch, bollocks, bullshit, feck, pissed, pissed-off, shit, tits

Strong words: Bastard, beaver, beef curtains, cock, dick, twat

Strongest words: Cunt, fuck, motherfucker

Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

Don’t miss out on:

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan I

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II

Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in Catalan

An easy guide to Catalan flags

Thank you for your attention. We look forward to your comments and questions. Nuts ~Tocat del bolet, Catalan culture crossing borders! Share this post!

Have a good one! (Que vagi bé!)

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II

Typical British expressions and their equivalent in Catalan language PART 2

Bones!

Welcome back! Here are 20 further common British English expressions translated to Catalan. As in the first part of Common BrE expressions translated to Catalan, they sound very idiomatic in both languages, so, again, if you ever go to the UK or Catalonia and use these expressions, you will probably impress locals.So let’s have a look at these new expressions:

(to) be stuffed

To be stuffed means to be very full. In Catalan language it can be translated as the very idiomatic expression estar tip, for example No en vull més. Estic tip (I’m good. I’m stuffed).

I’m gutted

I’m gutted means that I am very disappointed. In Catalan, you can say M’he quedat xof / Estic decebut/da.

I’m gutted

(To) be in a pickle

It means (to) be in a difficult or confused situation. In Catalan Estar (ficat) en un merder / embolic.

I’m in a pickle.

That’s mental / It’s mental

Something is crazy or surprising. In Catalan És de bojos (to say that something is a madness) or Quina passada or Brutal (for a surprising thing) depending on the context..

It’s mental!

Give me a bell

It basically means Get in touch with me or Call me. Very similar to the expression we saw in the first part Give me a tinkle (on the blower)> In Catalan, you can say Fes-me un truc or just Truca’m (Call me).

Give me a bell

(to) be in a mood

It means (to) be in a bad mood / upset. In Catalan slang you can say Estar ratllat. In a colloquial language you can say No estar del tot fi/fina or Estar de mala lluna.

I’m in a mood

Crickey / Blimey

It is an expressions to show shock or surprise. In Catalan, you can say Ostres!, ospa! (this one quite provincial), Caram! or, in slang language Wala! (this one quite urban).

(to) take the mickey out of someone

It means to make a joke about someone or to tease them. You are taking the mickey out of me. In Catalan You are taking the mickey out of me can be translated as Em fots el pèl or Me l’estàs fotent.

He’s taking the mickey out of us.

(to) pull someone’s leg

Very similar to make the mickey out of someone. This somewhat old-fashioned expression means to make a joke about someone or to tease them. In Catalan Prendre / fotre el pèl.

(to) faff about / around

We are constantly doing it, specially with social networks. Waffing about or around means to waste time doing unimportant tasks instead of the thing that one should be doing. In Catalan you can say Fer el dropo or Perdre / Matar el temps.

(to) lose the plot

(to) Lose the plot means (to) become confused / (to) do something crazy. In Catalan you can say anar-se’n l’olla. Se m’ha anat l’olla (I lost the plot).

I’ve lost the plot

That’s crap

Slang. You wouldn’t use it in a formal situation. You use it to say that something is not good, that something is rubbish, of low quality. In Catalan you can say És una merda or de merda (if it works as an adjective). For instance una peli de merda (A crap movie). We love the expression Una merda pinxada en un pal (literally, a shit pricked with a stick) to refer to something that is worth nothing.

(to) nick

(to) Nick is slang for (to) steal something. In Catalan you can say Pispar (slang). There is also the slang word mangar, if you like. It is not so genuine as pispar, but many people say it.

(to) have had one’s chips

(to) fail at something or lose an opportunity. In Catalan you can say Cagar-la or espifiar-la. L’he cagat! (=I’ve had my chips!). Nano, l’has cagat! (Dude, you’ve had your chips!)

You’ve had your chips.

The bee’s knees

Slang. Something that is excellent, of a high quality. In Catalan language is ser la hòstia, una passada, brutal. Top. Pensa que és la hòstia, però només és una altra poser d’Instagram (=She thinks she is the bee’s knees, but she’s just another Instagram poser).

(to) take the biscuit

It means (to) be rude/offensive/particularly bad. In Catalan is ser un estúpid, ser un impresentable, (or un borde).

Shattered

As we saw in the first part of this series, it is synonymous with Knackered, which means very tired. In Catalan it is Fet pols or Rebentat. Estic fet pols. Estic rebentat. (I’m knackered. I’m shattered).

I’m shattered

I’m not being funny, but

It means I don’t mean to be rude, but… (very idiomatic, it sounds very British). In Catalan you can say No és per tallar el rotllo, però… Notice that here the word funny changes its meaning.

I’m not being funny, but…

A spanner in the works

It refers to something unexpected that can disrupt or confuse a situation. In Catalan you can say Posar pals a les rodes. For instance, Van retirar el finançament per l’espectacle i això va posar pals a les rodes (The funding for the show was withdrawn so that really threw a spanner in the works). As you may know, a spanner is a tool with a shaped opening or jaws for gripping and turning a nut or bolt, so the metaphor is quite clear here.

(to) head somewhere

It essentially means (to) go somewhere. In Catalan, Fer cap a algun lloc. Fem cap a la festa. We’re heading for the party.

Mint / That’s mint

It refers to something that is excellent or in perfect condition. In Catalan you can say Genial, perfecte or de pu*a mare.. (the missing word is t). For instance That’s mint! (Està perfecte)

Brolly

Slang for umbrella. Informal. Oh, no! I forgot my brolly! Catalan: Paraigües.

Beeb

Colloquial expression for BBC. Informal.

Uni

Short for University. Informal. Catalan: la Uni.

Telly

Short for television. Informal. There’s nothing on the telly. Catalan: No fan res a la tele.

Chrimbo

Colloquial for Christmas. Informal. Are you going away for Chrimbo? Catalan: Nadal.

Footy

Short for football. Informal. Catalan: Futbol.

Offie

Short for Off-License. Informal. I’m just going to get some beers from the offi. Catalan: Botiga de queviures

Tommy K

Colloquial for Tomato Ketchup. Informal. Catalan: Ketchup.

Veg

Short for vegetables. Informal. Catalan: verdures.

Bicky

Short for biscuit. Informal. Catalan: galeta.

Brekky

Short for breakfast. Informal. Catalan: esmorzar.

Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

Thank you for your attention. We look forward to your comments and questions. Nuts ~Tocat del bolet, Catalan culture crossing borders! Share this post!

Don’t miss out on:

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan I

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan III (Slang edition)

Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in Catalan

Have a good one! (Que vagi bé!)

Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!

Idioms, sayings, fascinating language facts… Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in other languages

Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle meaning

The idiom monkey’s uncle is used to express astonishment, complete surprise or disbelief. A synonymous expression is It’s beyond belief! It can also be used to point out the infeasability of a situation, in the same way that “when pigs fly” is used.

Example

— Hey dude, there is a news article about a dog reciting “To be or not to be”!
— Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!

“The government wants to improve public services,” said Boris. “Well I’ll be a monkey’s uncle,” said Jeremy, “didn’t they just slash the social services budget in half?”

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in Catalan

There is a widespread idiom in Catalan which reads N’hi ha per a llogar-hi cadires! (literally, ‘We could even rent chairs!’) which is also used to express astonishment, complete surprise or disbelief. It can also be used to point out the infeasibility of a situation, in the same way that ‘(well) I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!’ is used in English.

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in French

In French there are several equivalent expressions to ‘(well) I’ll be a monkey’s uncle’ , for example, the most emblematic and international of all: ‘Oh la la!’ , which usually has rather positive connotations. There’s also C’est étonnant! (It’s incredible!), Je n’en reviens pas! (I can’t believe it!), J’en suis resté bouche bée (I’m speechless), Tu plaisantes! (literally, C’mon! You can’t be serious) … and one that we love:  Mais qu’est ce que c’est que ça! (literally, ‘but what is it!’), Which usually has an angry connotation. Finally, we can also use the expression Mince alors (which has the approximate meaning of (upon) my word!).

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in German

To express surprise in German, there is the curious idiom Ich glaub mich knutscht ein Elch! (Literally, I think an elk is kissing me!. And the interjection” Ach, nee! “(Literally,” Oh, come on!” ). * An elk is a ruminant mammal similar to a deer.

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in Portuguese

In Portuguese, to express surprise in the face of something unexpected, there is a very curious expression, one of those idioms which translated literally sounds quite surrealistic: Macacos me mordam! (Literally, May macaques bite me!). Nevertheless, it uses monkeys, just like in English.

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle in Spanish

Here, surely, a never-ending debate could be opened, but the closest interjection to (Well) I’ll be a monkey’s uncle! in Spanish is ¡Lo que hay que ver! or Hay que ver! . There’s also ¡Madre mía! (literally My mother!) Since it can express surprise, disappointment or displeasure. Although in a more colloquial record, there is also another possibility that we particulary love: Cágate lorito! (literally, Shit yourself little parrot!) . In Spanish we would also have other expressions of surprise in the presence of something unexpected, such as ¡Que me parta un rayo! (literlly, May a beam break me in two!).

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Catalan flags explained

An easy guide to Catalan Flags

Catalan people are friendly, open-minded and love democracy and fundamental rights. Catalans, diverse as they may be, feel very proud of their culture and history and have a long record of resisting repression and fighting against absolutism and fascism.

If you have been in Catalonia recently, you may have noticed that Catalans —in pro-democracy and pro-independence demonstrations, in their vehicles or in their balconies— proudly show and wave their flags…. But, come to think of it, they look quite different! Contrasting colours, disparate layouts and patterns… So why all these different banners and emblems? Let’s find out!

Understanding Catalan flags

The pro-independence movement is an inclusive, grass-roots, radically democratic movement that brings together people from all walks of life and different ideologies who agree upon two principles: Catalan people deserve the right to decide their own future and fundamental rights must be guaranteed. Such heterogeneity is reflected in the different flags (not all of them necessary pro-independence). So here are the main flags (and some not so well-known) that you may come across:

The senyera

This is the official flag of Catalonia and one of the oldest to still be flown in Europe. Not necessarily pro-independence, but it is the one you will see in Public buildings and representing official events. Some people call it the ‘autonomist’ flag meaning that it stands for stagnation. It is a vexillological symbol based on the coat of arms of the Crown of Aragon, which consists of four red stripes on a golden background. Pronunciation: /səˈɲeɾə/ Senyera means Pennon, a flags carried during the Middle Ages.

The ‘blue’ Estelada

The Catalan word estelada (pronunciation: /əstəˈɫaðə/) can be translated into English as starlit flag, or starry flag. This is probably the most popular of all Catalan flags. It is actually an unofficial flag typically flown by Catalan independence supporters to express their wish for an independent and free Catalonia. The design of the Estelada, by Vicenç Albert Ballester, was modelled on the Cuban and Puerto Rican flags.

By the way, here is the first ‘estelada’, with a blue rhombus, the old version of the current blue design:

The ‘red’ Estelada

The main difference from the blue estelada is the colour of the emblem. But there is more to this flag than meets the eye. The ‘red’ estelada is a favourite among left-wing political pro-independence parties while the ‘blue’ one is a favourite among nationalist pro-independence parties.

The ‘black’ Estelada

This flag was used by 14th century Catalan soldiers Almogavers . It includes a white x-shaped cross as a symbol which represents Santa Eulàlia, one of Barcelona’s Saint patronesses who was crucified in this kind of x-shaped cross. This flag was used to commemorate the Tercentenary of the War of Succession (a European conflict of the early 18th century which deeply marked the history of Catalonia). The Black Flag, meaning no surrender as opposed to the white flag is becoming very popular. In the awful siege of Barcelona and Cardona, in the war of 1714, a black flag with the words “Viurem lliures o morirem”(literaly, We will live free or we will die”) flough on the walls.

The ‘green’ Estelada

Green version used by ecologists and animalists.

The anarchist Estelada

Anarchist pro-independence Catalan flag

The ‘white’ Estelada

Estelada used by the PSAN (1968-1977), Marxist Unification Movement (1977-1978), Catalan Workers Bloc (1978-1982) and Left Bloc for National Liberation (1979-1982).

LGTB Estelada

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender estelada.

Catalan Republican Flag

Catalan Republic flag to commemorate the referendum on 1 October — also known by the numeronym 1-O . This wonderfully designed flag is becoming very popular. It looks like a little work of art.

Recommended post:

Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

Thank you for your attention. We look forward to your comments and questions. Nuts ~Tocat del bolet, Catalan culture crossing borders! Share this post!

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan

Typical British expressions and their equivalent in Catalan language

Very British English expressions translated to Catalan

Here are 22 common British English expressions translated to Catalan. As a matter of fact, they sound very idiomatic in both languages, so if you ever go to Catalonia and you use these Catalan expressions, you will probably blow people’s minds!

By the way, you may have wondered what the name of this blog, “tocat del bolet” means. It is a Catalan idiom that can be translated into English as cracked; crazy; potty; round the bend; nuts; crackers; bonkered or (as) nutty as a fruitcake .

This is our first post in English. However, if you visit the section in Catalan, at least you’ll be able to translate them with google translate. We know it’s not the same, specially with idioms, but it can give you an idea about this blog.

Let us however, without further ado, take a good look at the list of genuine British expressions.

I’m knackered!

I’m knackered means “I’m very tired”. In Catalan, “Estic fet pols” (literally, “I’m dust”) or “Estic fet caldo” (literally, “I’m broth”). Both “Estic fet pols” and “Estic fet caldo” are what Catalan native speakers would naturally say when they are really tired.

It’s not my cup of tea

“It’s not my cup of tea” means “I don’t like it very much” or “I’m not very fond of sth” or “It’s not my type”. In Catalan, “No em fa el pes” (literally, “It doest make the weight”). I know, it doesn’t make much sense, but you know, idioms not always have a literal meaning. It is a very common Catalan expression. If you want to say that someone is not your type, you can also say “no és el meu tipus” .

It's not my cup of tea in Catalan
Catalan expressions

Fancy a cuppa?

It is an invitation to have tea together. In Catalan, “Fem un te?” (literally, “let’s have a tea (together)”) . You can actually use the verb fem with coffee, beers…

☕ Fancy a cuppa?

I’m pissed

It means that you are drunk. In Catalan, “Vaig pet” . Literally, “I go fart”.

Mate

Maybe the quintessential British word. It is slang for “friend” . It is very common in Australia too, and although it is not used in American English,  it is understood by English speakers all over the world. In Catalan, “company” . You can also use the word “amic” (friend), but it has slightly different connotations.

That’s rubbish!

It means “nonesense”. In Catalan, “I què més?!” (literally, “And what more!?”, or “Au, vinga!” (literally, “C’mon, you can’t be serious!” ). On the other hand, “Bollocks!” can be translated as “Collonades!” (literally, “bollocks!”).

Bollocks!

It is a swear word that refers to the male organs contained in the scrotum. In Catalan “Collons!” if you are cursing and “collonades” if you are referring to information deliberately intended to mislead or nonsense. “Collons” is one of the first swear words a foreigner learns in Catalan.

Bob’s your uncle

Bob’s your uncle is added to the end of sentences to express “and that’s it” . In Catalan you can say “i llestos” (literaly, “and ready”) at the end of a sentence to convey the same meaning. In Catalan there’s also another possibility, which is “tal dia farà un any” (literally, “any day, a year will have passed by”) and it is used to downplay an issue.

Bob's your uncle

Fancy that

Primarily heard in UK. Usually said when someone is surprised to hear or see something. In Catalan, you can say “Ves per on!” . It is a very Catalan expression quite difficult to translate. It literally means “Go along where!” or even, in not such a literal way, “I didn’t expect that coming!” .

Damp squib

See the meaning in the picture below. In Catalan, “un bluf” (literally, “a flop”).

Bugger off!

It means “Go away” . In Catalan you can say “fot el camp!” (literally, “fuck the field”. Yes, we know, it sounds kind of weird, but in Catalan it sounds very natural, although, come to think of it, it is quite rude).

Bugger off! Sod off! Fot el camp!
Bugger off! Sod off! Fot el camp!

Sod off!

It also means “Go away” . In Catalan you can say “fot el camp“(see previous entry)

Fancy a few sherbets?

That’s an invitation to have some beers or spirits together. In Catalan, “Fem unes birres?” (literally, “let’s have some beers?”. The word sherbet apparently has a comedic effect when pronounced in a South London accent.

Can’t be arsed

It means “Cannot be bothered”, or that you don’t feel it worthwhile to make the effort of standing up and doing something. In Catalan, there is the slang expression “No em ratllis” (literally, “Don’t grate me”). This implies that you don’t feel like being bothered by someone.

What a cock up!

It means “What a mistake!” . In Catalan, you can say “Quina cagada!” (literally, “what a shit!” or “what a blunder!”) o “Quina ficada de pota!” (something along the lines of “Ooops, I’ve really put my foot in it!”).

I have to spend a penny

It means “I have to go to the toilet”. In Catalan “vaig a canviar l’aigua de les olives” (literally, “I’m going to change the water of my olives”).

What are you going on about?

It means “What are you talking about?”. In Catalan slang is “Què t’empatolles?” .

(S)He’s a few sandwiches short of a picnic 

It means “(S)He is not very smart”. In Catalan, “és una mica curt/a de gambals” .

You’re a ledge

This is a shortening of the word “legend.” A legend is someone who is very good at something, even well-known, often for doing something great or incredible.  In Catalan, “Ets un crack!” . Messi is a ledge! El Messi és un crack.

Bloody hell!

It is a curse to show that you are angry. There are many ways to translate this expression in Catalan, such as “Maleït sia!” (literally, “Damn it”) or “Em cago en tot!” (literally , “I shit on everything”).

Give me a tinkle on the blower

It means “Give me a call” or “ring me”. The phrase is often shortened to “give me a tinkle” . Many Catalans say “Fes-me un truc” (literally, “make me a call”). But watch out! If you ask a magician “Fes-me un truc”, you are actually asking them to do a magic trick for you.

It’s swings and roundabouts

This idiom has to do with life’s ups and downs, with gains and losses that offset each other. In Catalan there is an idiom that reads “Una de freda i una de calenta” (literally, “A cold one and a hot one”) which has the same meaning.

It's swings and roundabouts in Catalan

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan III

Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

Thank you for your attention. We look forward to your comments and questions. Nuts ~Tocat del bolet, Catalan culture crossing borders! Share this post!