The Christmas poop log

A eschatological yet charming Catalan Christmas tradition

On our traditions section, today we’ll talk about a Catalan log that, believe it or not, poops nougats, candies and toys at Christmas
The tió —often popularly called Tió de Nadal (Christmas log) or even Caga tió (“shitting log”, “poo log”), pronounced “Cagga-tee-oh”— is a wooden log with a smiley face painted onto one end.
On Christmas Day or, in some households, on Christmas Eve, to make it defecate, one beats the tió with a stick, while singing various songs. After hitting the tió softly with a stick during the song, it is hit harder on the last verse. Then somebody —most typically a kid— puts their hand under the blanket and takes a gift.

Tió song (there are many, here is just an example):
shit, log,
shit nougats,
hazelnuts and mató cheese,
if you don’t shit well,
I’ll hit you with a stick,
shit, log!

Origin of the Poop Log Tió

But where does the Tió tradition come from? This pagan tradition, known as making the Christmas tió poo (or crap, or shit), has a rural origin and it also exists in some areas of Aragon and Occitania (in the south of France).

The Tió was a trunk that burned in the fireplace and then people spread its ashes because it was thought to have protective properties. Somehow it was a symbol for a change of cycle or, if you like, a change of year. The Tió was thought to represent the sleeping nature in winter, and to be a symbol for its abundance. That is why, when you hit it with a stick, what you are really doing is waking it up, that is to say, you wake up the nature that bountifully gives us its fruits — hence the gift “defecated” by the trunk.

This tradition extended in the 18th and 19th centuries. Then it expanded to the cities. After a few decades, the tradition fell into oblivion, but it strongly returned in the 1960’s. From then on, a face was painted onto one end of the log, a typical Catalan hat called barretina was added, and it was covered with a blanket to keep it cold.

Tocat del Bolet ~ Nuts Catalan culture crossing borders!

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It is not my cup of tea

It’s not my cup of tea. Definition, examples and equivalents in other languages.

You say that something is not your cup of tea when it is unconvincing or fails to satisfy. It is mostly used in the negative form, but you can also use it in the positive form to say that you like something. An equivalent expression in English is It doesn’t float my boat. You can say it in positive (for instance, Ok, whatever floats your boat) or in the negative form.

It's not my cup of tea
idioms typical expressions
It's my cup of tea
idioms typical expressions
It doesn't float my boat
idioms

Examples

Football is not my cup of tea, but my brother loves it.

Rococo staircases are not my cup of tea.

Hip Hop is much more my cup of tea than techno music.

It is not my cup of tea in other languages.

It is not my cup of tea in Catalan

In Catalan, a very usual and idiomatic equivalent expression for It is not my cup of tea is No em fa el pes (literally, it doesn’t do me the weight) or No m’acaba de fer el pes (literally, It fails to do me the weight). Yeah, we know it sounds weird, but it is quite widespread.

It's not my cup of tea in Catalan
It's not my cup of tea
idioms typical expressions

It is not my cup of tea in (Mandarin) Chinese

The equivalent idiom in Mandarin Chinese is 不是我的菜 (literally, This is not my dish).

不是我的菜
It is not my cup of tea in Mandarin Chinese
It's not my cup of tea
idioms typical expressions

It is not my cup of tea in Czech

In Czech you can say Není to můj šálek kávy/čaje (literally, It’s not my cup of coffee/tea).

It's not my cup of tea in czech
idioms typical expressions

It is not my cup of tea in French

In French, just like in English, you can say Ce n’est pas ma tasse de thé (literally, It is not my cup of tea) or C’est (pas) mon truc (FR) (literally, it’s not my thing), to say that you don’t like something. The familiar C’est (pas) mon délire (literally, It’s not my delirium) works as well in circles of young friends. Another familiar expression is C’est (pas) mon dada (literally, It’s not my hobby), which is older. It works in negative form but is mostly used affirmatively.

It is not my cup of tea in French
Idioms

It is not my cup of tea in German

In German you can say Das ist nicht mein Ding (literally, It is not my thing).

It is not my cup of tea in German
Das ist nicht mein Ding

It is not my cup of tea in Italian

In Italian you can say Non fa per me (literally, it does not do for me). It is very similar to the Catalan expression No fa per mi. Other expressions in Italian you may use to express the same idea are Non è il mio genere (literally, It is not my genre), Non è il mio forte (Informal, literally, It is not my strength), Non è roba per me (colloquial and slightly regional, literally, These are not clothes for me), Non è di mio gradimento (formal, literally, It is not my liking), Non è di mio gusto (formal, literally, It is not of my taste).

It is not my cup of tea in Italian
Non fa per me

It is not my cup of tea in Japanese

In Japanese you can say 好みではない (pronounced Konomide wanai, literally, It doesn´t enter my ki).

It is not my cup of tea in Malay

In Malai language you can say Bukan bidang aku la (literally, not my field).

Bukan bidang aku la It's not my field in Malay

It is not my cup of tea in (Brazilian) Portuguese

In Brazilian Portuguese the equivalent expression is Não é minha praia (literally, this is not my beach).

It is not my cup of tea in (Brazilian) Portuguese

It is not my cup of tea in Russian

It is not my cup of tea in Russian is Это не моё / Это не в моём вкусе, pronounced Eto ne moyo / Eto ne v moyom vkuse (Literally: It’s not mine / It’s not to my liking).

It's not my cup of tea in Russian
idioms typical expressions

It is not my cup of tea in Spanish

In Spanish you may say No es santo de mi devotión (literally, He is not a saint of my devotion) or No es plato de mi gusto (literally, It is not a dish of my taste *). 

It is not my cup of tea in Spanish

And that’s pretty much it. Thank you for visiting Nuts (Tocat del Bolet)!

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Pep talk

Meaning of Pep talk

A Pep talk is a short speech intended to make someone or a group of people feel more courageous or enthusiastic.

As many Brits, Catalans and football fans know, the current Manchester City coach Pep Guardiola is known, among other things, for this type of motivational speeches.

Examples

His pep talk and leadership convinced them all.

The coach gave the team a pep talk before the game.

Origin of the expression

As it seems, the word “pep” comes from “pepper”. It has been used in the figurative sense of energy or spirit since 1847. A pep talk is intended to energize someone or a group of people and appeared in 1926. The first written use of the phrase “pep talk” was found in “The Mansfield News”.

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Most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English

You know what really grinds my gears

The ‘best’ British insults

Animal idioms

You can’t get blood out of a stone

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan

Good things come in small packages

Jeepers creepers!

Scottish Gaelic on Duolingo!

More than 25,000 people have already signed up to learn Scottish Gaelic on Duolingo

Madainn mhath! (Welcome!) We have great news: The popular language-learning APP has launched a Scottish Gaelic course created with the help and advise of volunteers across Scotland and more than 25,000 people have already signed up to learn Scottish Gaelic on Duolingo.

This course will probably open up Scottish Gaelic to millions of people in the UK and across the world. So we are over the moon. Tocat del Bolet (Nuts) is committed to the protection of minority —and minoritised— languages and, needless to say, we love Scotland.

Scots Gaelic language, also called Scottish GaelicScots Gaelic or Gàidhlig, is a member of the Goidelic group of Celtic languages. It is currently spoken along the northwest coast of Scotland and in the Hebrides islands. Australia, the United States, and Nova Scotia in Canada are also home to Scots Gaelic communities.

A language involves a way of understanding the world, of relating to one another, of loving and feeling. That’s why Scottish Gaelic, like any other minority language, must be protected and regarded as a cultural treasure.

There is concern about the state of Scots Gaelic. In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (only 1.1% of the Scottish population) were reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001. It was classed as an indigenous language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, which the British government has ratified, and the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 established a language-development body, namely, Bòrd na Gàidhlig.

Now Duolingo is contributing to the revival efforts and we would like to thank the popular APP for doing its bit.

So, Scots of the world, unite! Don’t let Scottish Gaelic disappear. We also encourage non-Scottish people to learn this interesting language. As Charlemagne put it, to have another language is to possess a second soul.

Tapadh leibh! (thank you!)

Recommended links

Bòrd na Gàidhlig

Duolingo

Scottish proverbs

Scottish Gaelic ⇆ Catalan Simple Greetings

Most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English

Catalan flags explained

Jeepers creepers!

Jeepers creepers. Meaning. Examples. Jeepers creepers in other languages.

Meaning

Jeepers Creepers or just jeepers or creepers is an expression of surprise or annoyance derived from Jesus Christ. You use this exclamation especially if there are kids around or you are from the 1950s. It is similar to Darn it!

Examples

Jeepers creepers! He just shot Albert!

Jeepers creepers! He’s done it again!

douche canoe
jeepers creepers

Jeepers creepers in Catalan

Vatua l’olla! (literally, Oh pot!). Also, Mare de Déu (literally, mother of God) or Alsa Manela (Wow Manela!).

Jeepers creepers in French

In French you can say zut (literally, cursed, although its meaning can vary considerably depending on the context), Mille misères! (literally, a thousand miseries!), or even the multi-purpose Merde! “(Literally, shit! ).

jeepers creepers in French

Jeepers creepers in German

In German you can use Mensch! (Literally, “man!”), which is an exclamation of surprise.

Jeepers creepers in Italian

In Italian you can say Capperacci (something along the lines of Jeepers creepers or Damn it), or Cavoli!  (literally, sprouts!). For example: Capperacci, sober ubriaco! (Jeepers Creepers, I’m drunk!).

Jeepers creepers in Mandarin Chinese

In Mandarin Chinese you can say  哎呀 (pronounced tiān nǎ, āiy ā, which is used to express astonishment and translates literally as oh, God!). For example: 哎呀, 看看 都 几点 了! 我 要 晚 了! (Jeepers creepers! Look at the time! I’m late!).

Jeepers creepers in Chinese

Jeepers creepers in Portuguese

In Portuguese we can say carpa or eh pá! which are also expressions of surprise or annoyance.

Jeepers creepers in Spanish

In Spanish you can say ¡Córcholis!,¡Recórcholis!,¡Mecachis! ¡Carajo!… And also ¡Caray! O ¡Cásita! For instance: Recórcholis, ¡no hay manera! (Jeepers creepers, there’s no way to do it!).

jeepers creepers in European Spanish

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Good things come in small packages

Sayings. Good things come in small packages. Meaning and example. Good things come in small packages in other languages.

Meaning

When someone says Good / Best / Big / The best things come in small packages they mean that even though something may be small, it is of better quality than big things. So the bottom line is that things should not be underestimated because of their small size.

Example

At the end of the day, little things, such as gathering rosebuds, is what bring meaning back into my life. You know, good things come in small packages.

Good things come in small packages

Good things come in small packages in Basque language

Lurrin ona flasko txikietan saltzen da (literally, a good perfume is sold in small bottles).

Good things come in small packages in Catalan

Al pot petit hi ha la bona confitura (literally, the good jam is in the small jar).

Good things come in small packages in (Mandarin) Chinese

好東西不在個頭大 (pronounced Hǎo dōngxī bùzài gètóu dà; literally Small things are big) .

Good things come in small packages in French

Tout ce qui est petit est mignon (literally, All that is small is nice); also Dans les petites boîtes, les bons onguents (literally, Inside the small boxes, the good ointents).

Good things come in small packages in Galician language

As boas cousas véndense en pequenas doses (literally, Good things are sold in small doses).

Good things come in small packages in German

In den kleinsten Flaschen ist das beste Likör (literally, In the small bottles there is the best liquor).

Good things come in small packages in Italian

Nelle botti piccine ci sta il vino buono (literally, In the small barrels, there is the good wine).

Good things come in small packages in Scots language

In Scottish language —attention, not Scots Gaelic— you can say Guid gear comes in sma’buck which means more or less the same.

Good things come in small packages in Spanish

El perfume (o la esencia) se vende en tarro pequeño (literally, Perfume is sold in small jars).

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You know what really grinds my gears

List of the most annoying daily setbacks and nuisances that really grind my gears

(to) grind one’s gears meaning

(to) grind one’s gears is an American English idiom meaning that something or someone makes you angry or annoys you. This idiom was recently popularized by fictional character Peter Griffin, the main character of the American animated sitcom Family Guy.

What really grinds my gears

Here is a list of the everyday situations, setbacks, misfortunes and twists that really grind my gears, or annoy me to such an extreme that really salt my apples or make me blow a fuse, blow a gasket, blow my top… Well, you know what I mean.

You know what really grinds my gears

I’m not a short fuse, I’m not specially quick to temper… but even though they may seem small details, trifles, or if you like, trivialities, they really manage to get on my nerves. Just imagine they all happen the same day… believe me, it could end up badly. Yeah, even a model citizen could end up losing their head and behaving like Michael Douglas in Falling Down.

So, without further ado, let’s take a look at these annoying and inconvenient daily setbacks:

List of things that grind my gears

When you are in bed, as snug as a bug in a rug, and suddenly remember that you left the washing machine on, so you need to get up and hang up clothes.

annoying things
things that really grind my gears
The washing machine!

When the earphone cables get tangled and you need to spend your valuable time untangling the fu***ng mess.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you step on a dog turd when heading to an important appointment or, even worse, a romantic date.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

Spoilers… I just hate them! They should know that loose lips sink ships.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you realize, after taking a shower, you didn’t take the towel (specially annoying in winter).

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you can’t escape from a smart-ass who happens to be a relative and you run out of painkillers.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
What a drag! What a headache!

When you placidly conclude your digestive process and find out there isn’t any toilet paper left.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
Shit!

When egg yolks pop out when frying. However hard you try to disguise your blunder, everybody will notice.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When your shoes and, even worse, your socks get wet on a cold and rainy winter day. It only adds insult to injury if you happen to be on your way to work and you are late. You know… It never rains but it pours.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
Oh, no!

When you forget to save the files you have been working so hard on.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

What about you? What grinds your gears? Mosquitoes? Rude people? Reckless drivers? Cooking oil spilled out on the kitchen floor? Let us know.

Thank you for you visit. We look forward to seeing you around soon.

Synonyms of (to) grind one’s gears meaning

There are several synonyms of this expressions, such as (to) irritate, (to) annoy, (to) be like a bear with a sore head, (to) blow a fuse, (to) blow a gasket, (to) blow your top, (to be) be cheesed off, (to) drive someone up the wall, (to) fly off the handle, (to) get someone’s goat

(to) Grind one’s gears in other languages

(to) grind one’s gears in Catalan: Treure de polleguera (to) grind one’s gears in French: faire sortir quelqu’un de ses gonds (to) grind one’s gears in German: wahnsinnig machen (to) grind one’s gears in Spanish: sacar de quicio

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Animal idioms

Animal idioms illustrated and translated to Catalan

Ants in one’s pants

(to) be restless, uneasy. Catalan: un sac de nervis (literally, a bag of nerves).

Red herring

A misleading clue or piece of information. Catalan: pista falsa (literally, false clue).

(the) birds and the bees

Sex education. Catalan: la cigonya (literally, the stork)

White elephant

An unwated or annoying possession. Catalan: Regal enverinat (literally, poisoned gift)

… And while we’re at it, some jokes about elephants:

What did the elephant say to a naked man?
Hey that’s cute but can you breath through it?
What’s grey, stands in a river when it rains and doesn’t get wet?
An elephant with an umbrella!
Why does an elephant wear sneakers?
So that he can sneak up on mice!

Cat nap

A short sleep. Catalan: fer una becaina (literally, to take a nap)

As happy as a clam

Very happy. Catalan: content com un gínjol (literally, happy as a jujube).

Fishy

Odd, strange, suspicious. Catalan: (hi ha) gat amagat (literally, there’s a hidden cat here).

While we’re at it, a fish joke:

What did the fish say when he posted bail? “I’m off the hook!”

One trick pony

Someone who has only one ability or good quality . Catalan: there is no equivalent, the literal translation is Poni d’un sol truc.

A different kettle of fish

A completely different thing, topic or subject (very similar to a horse of a different colour). Catalan: figues d’un altre paner (literally, figs from another pannier or basket)

A horse of a different color

A completely different thing, topic or subject (very similar to a different kettle of fish). Catalan: figues d’un altre paner (literally, figs from another pannier or basket).

A guinea pig

Someone used as part of an experiment or trial. Catalan: conillet d’indies)

While we are are it, here is a joke about guinea pigs…

Q: When do guinea pigs run away from rain? A: When its raining cats and dogs!

Weasel out

(to) abandon their responsibility or commitment in a way that is sneaky or cowardly. Catalan: escaquejar-se (colloquial, literally, to cop out).

While we are at it, here is a joke about weasels:

A 13 year old weasel walks into a bar and approaches the counter. The bartender immediately notices the underage weasel.
“Sir, you look extremely young. I can’t serve you even a single beer.”
“Oh c’mon. You can’t just slide me one?”
“Can’t and will not serve to anyone under age.”
“Fine. Well what other things do you have?”
“Well for non-alcoholics I have tap water and bottled water, I have coffee, and I have pop. Which would you like?”
“Pop.” Goes the weasel.

Wouldn’t hurt a fly

A very peaceful and non-violent person. Catalan: No li faria mal a una mosca (literally, wouldn’t hurt a fly).

While we’re at it, here is two jokes about flies:

What is the difference between a fly and a bird? A bird can fly but a fly can’t bird!

What do you call a fly that is ill? Answer: The flew

Mad as a hornet

Extremely angry or upset. Catalan: empipat com una mona (angry as a monkey).

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!

Also Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle! Used to express complete surprise, amazement or disbelief . Catalan: N’hi ha per a llogar-hi cadires (literally, there is to rent chairs!) or Me’n faig creus (literally, I make myself crosses).

A cock-and-bull story

An exaggerated or falsified story or explanation. Catalan: un sopar de duro (literally, a one coin dinner).

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You can’t get blood out of a stone

Meaning. Examples. Equivalents in other languages.

Meaning

You can’t get blood out of a stone or You can’t get blood from a stone means that it is pointless to expect positive results from someone or something that doesn’t have the will, the ability or the resources.

Examples

Persuading Mary to come to the party is like getting blood from a stone.

Getting him to come clean is like trying to get blood out of a stone.

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Catalan

 You can't get blood out of a stone in Catalan

You can’t get blood out of a stone in French

C’est comme se heurter à un mur (literally, It’s like hitting your head against a wall).

You can't get blood out of a stone in French

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Irish Gaelic

Is doiligh olann a bhaint de ghabhar ( literally, it’s hard to get wool off a goat).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in German

Verlorene Liebesmüh  ( literally, Love’s Labour’s Lost).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Italian

Come picchiare un cavallo morto ( literally, It’s like flogging a dead horse) .

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Portuguese

Tirar nabos da púcara ( literally, to throw prickly turnips).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Spanish

No le pidas peras al olmo (literally, don’t ask for pears to an elm tree)

You can't get blood out of a stone in Spanish

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Thanks for visiting Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet