Interesting places in Barcelona

Are you planning to visit Barcelona? First you should know that Barcelona is the capital city of Catalonia. It is located on the northeastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula and is the second most populous city in Spain after Madrid. Barcelona is known for its rich history, stunning architecture, and vibrant culture. People there speak Catalan and Spanish. It’s always nice to start a conversation with a little bit of Catalan. People really appreciate it when you make the effort. Here are some simple words and phrases you can use: “Bon dia” means “good morning”, “Em dic (your name)” means “my name is (your name)”, “Adéu” means “goodbye”, “Gràcies” means “thanks”, “Moltes gràcies” means “thank you very much”, and “Fins aviat” means “see you soon”.

Some of the top attractions in Barcelona include:

La Sagrada Familia (The Holy Family): A stunning expiatory temple designed by Antoni Gaudí

La Sagrada Familia (which means ‘The holy Family’) is a stunning expiatory temple located in Barcelona, Catalonia. It was designed by the famous Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city.

Construction of La Sagrada Familia began in 1882 and is still ongoing. The basilica is known for its unique architecture, which combines Gothic and Art Nouveau styles. The building features intricate carvings, colorful stained glass windows, and towering spires.

La Sagrada Familia Gaudi
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Visitors to La Sagrada Familia can take a guided tour of the basilica and learn about its history and architecture. The building also features a museum with exhibits on Gaudí and the history of the basilica.

Park Güell: A beautiful park with colorful mosaics and stunning views of the city.

Park Güell is a beautiful park located in Barcelona, Spain. It was designed by the famous Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí and is known for its colorful mosaics and stunning views of the city.

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Antonio Gaudi
Antoni Gaudí
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The park features a number of unique architectural elements, including a large terrace with colorful mosaics and sculptures, a dragon fountain, and a winding bench covered in colorful tiles. Visitors to Park Güell can take a guided tour of the park and learn about its history and architecture.

La Pedrera House

Have you heard of La Pedrera? It’s also known as Casa Milà, a really cool modernist building in Barcelona. Antoni Gaudí designed it, and it was built between 1906 and 1910 in the Eixample district. It’s super iconic and definitely worth checking out if you’re in the area. You can even go inside and see the amazing terrace where Gaudí put stone warriors.

La Pedrera
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Antonio Gaudi

Casa Batlló (Batllo House): A unique building designed by Antoni Gaudí.

Casa Batlló (Batlló House) is a beautiful building located in Barcelona, Spain. It was designed by the famous Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí and is known for its unique architecture and colorful facade.

Casa Batlló
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The building features a number of unique architectural elements, including a colorful facade with intricate carvings and mosaics, a stunning rooftop terrace with views of the city, and a beautiful interior with curved walls and colorful stained glass windows.

Visitors to Casa Batlló can take a guided tour of the building and learn about its history and architecture. The building also features a museum with exhibits on Gaudí and the history of Casa Batlló.

Gothic Quarter: A historic neighborhood with narrow streets and beautiful architecture.

The Gothic Quarter is the historic center of the old city of Barcelona. It stretches from La Rambla to Via Laietana, and from the Mediterranean seafront to the Ronda de Sant Pere. It is a part of Ciutat Vella district.

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The Gothic Quarter is known for its narrow streets and medieval architecture. Visitors to the Gothic Quarter can explore the area’s many historic buildings and landmarks, including the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia, also known as Barcelona Cathedral or La Seu Cathedral, which is a beautiful example of gothic architecture with soaring bell towers and detailed stonework.

There are also many shops, restaurants, and cafes in the Gothic Quarter, making it a popular destination for tourists and locals alike.

La Rambla: A famous street in the heart of Barcelona with shops, restaurants, and street performers.

La Rambla, also known as Las Ramblas, is an iconic promenade in the city of Barcelona that runs between the Plaza de Catalunya and the old port. It is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike and is filled with people day and night.

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The promenade is lined with trees and features many shops, restaurants, cafes, and street performers. Visitors to La Rambla can explore the area’s many historic buildings and landmarks, including the Gran Teatre del Liceu opera house and the Boqueria Market.

Camp Nou: The home stadium of FC Barcelona.

Camp Nou, which means ‘New Field’ or ‘New Pitch’, is the home stadium of FC Barcelona and is located in the Les Corts neighborhood of Barcelona. The stadium was built in 1957 and has a seating capacity of 99,354. It is the largest stadium in Spain and the third-largest football stadium in the world.

Football Club Barcelona Stadium
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New Camo
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Camp Nou has hosted many important football matches over the years, including several UEFA Champions League finals and the football competition at the 1992 Summer Olympics. The stadium also hosts concerts and other events throughout the year.

Barcelona beaches

If you’re planning a trip to Barcelona, you definitely won’t want to miss out on its lively Barcelona beaches. The locals love them, and tourists do too! Some of the most popular beaches are Barceloneta Beach, Nova Icaria Beach, and Bogatell Beach. These beaches have everything you need, from showers and changing rooms to great restaurants and cafes.

Barcelona beach
Barcelona beaches
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Barceloneta Beach is a must-visit. It’s full of energy and great for people-watching. Nova Icaria Beach is another fantastic option, especially if you’re looking for calmer waters to swim in. It’s located near the Olympic Village and is definitely worth a visit!

Santa Maria del Mar

If you’re ever in EL Born, you absolutely have to check out Santa Maria del Mar! It’s maybe the most outstanding church in Barcelona. Built between 1329 and 1383, it’s the only church of pure Catalan Gothic style. The structure has three almost the same height naves, with tall columns every 13 meters apart. It’s been around for a long time and has seen much of Barcelona’s history. The architecture is a testament to the prosperity the city has experienced in the past. El Born is a fantastic neighborhood where you can find all sorts of cool stuff – from delicious food to unique shops selling everything from jewelry to shoes. And if you’re into fashion, you’ve got to check out Colette Barcelona, an artist that turns memory into a jewel. El Born is truly a special place where culture and creativity come together.

Santa Maria del Mar
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The Four Cats (Els quatre gats)

Did you know that Els Quatre Gats, a cafe in Barcelona, has a rich history dating back to 1897? This famous spot was a popular hangout for artists and intellectuals during the Modernisme movement. The architect Josep Puig i Cadafalch designed the cafe in the basement of Casa Marti, another building he designed. Some real heavyweights in the art world frequented the cafe, including Pablo Picasso and Ramon Casas.

Els quatre gats
the four cats
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Picaso

The good news is that Els Quatre Gats still exists today and is open for business! You can grab a bite to eat or a drink there, and the cafe has been restored to its original design. It’s a great place to visit if you’re ever in Barcelona, especially if you’re a fan of history and art.

Boqueria Market

Have you heard of the Boqueria Market (or Mercat de la Boqueria, in Catalan) in Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter? It’s a famous food market that’s actually built on a former monastery. Crazy, right?! This market has been around since the 13th century and has over 300 stalls selling fresh produce, meats, seafood, and other food items. It’s definitely worth a visit if you’re in the area. You’ll find both locals and tourists browsing the stalls along the touristy La Rambla stretch. The market is open Monday to Saturday from 8:00am to 8:30pm, with an information point available from Monday to Saturday from 9:00am to 3:00pm. Hope you get a chance to check it out!

Boqueria Market
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The Old Charms Market (Els encants Vells)

If you’re into unique and exciting finds like antiques and crafts, you can’t miss The Old Charms Market (in Catalan, Els Encants Vells) – a unique market in the world! Located in Barcelona, this flea market has been around for over seven hundred years and is definitely worth visiting. You can find all sorts of items like vintage clothing, second-hand objects, and of course, antiques. It’s a unique flea market.

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Old charms
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flea market in Barcelona

Fun fact – the market was first located on La Rambla in 1808 before it was moved to a small hill in 1881 and renamed “Encants Vells” in 1822. If you want to check it out, the market is open from Monday to Saturday starting at 11:00am and closing at 10:00pm. But make sure beforehand if it is open, since there are days when they are not open. It is one of our favorite places. There is nothing like it in all of Europe.

Coin and stamp market

If you’re into numismatics like we are, we’ve got the perfect Sunday recommendation for you. Head over to Barcelona’s Plaça Reial (Royal Square) for the Numismatic Market where you’ll find a huge variety of coins, banknotes, stamps, and other collectibles like cava plates, pines, undergrowths, and sugar envelopes. The show’s real stars, though, are the coins, ranging from modern Euros to Roman, Greek, and medieval treasures. It’s a fantastic way to spend a Sunday morning if you’re a collector, with 36 licensed stands (26 for coins and 10 for stamps) open from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Numismatic Market
intage clothing, second-hand objects, and of course, antiques
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Tibidabo Mountain and Amusement Park

Did you know that Tibidabo is a beautiful mountain that overlooks Barcelona? It’s the highest point of the Collserola mountain range and is 512 meters high. The mountain is home to Spain’s oldest amusement park, Tibidabo Amusement Park, which has been open since 1901. You can enjoy a magical experience at the park with a mix of classic and modern attractions like the Watchtower (Talaia), The plane, the Roller-coaster, or the Virtual Express. You won’t want to miss the unique shows like the Krüeger Hotel or the Puppetarium (Marionetarium), and plenty of gastronomic spaces like Adventurers Club (Club dels Adventurers) keep you fueled up. It’s definitely worth a visit if you’re in the area!

Tibidabo mountain
Tibidabo amusement Park
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Tibidabo Mountain in Barcelona

Tibidabo mountain
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Tibidabo Mountain in Barcelona

Gracia neighbourhood

If you happen to be in Barcelona, you absolutely must check out Gracia! Gràcia, which means ‘Joy,’ is a district of Barcelona that’s made up of several awesome neighborhoods like ‘Vila de Gràcia’ (Gracia’s village), Vallcarca and els Penitents, El Coll, La Salut, Camp d’en Grassot, and Gràcia Nova (New Gracia). Gracia is situated on top of the Passeig de Gracia area of ‘Eixample’, and it feels like a cozy little village right in the heart of Barcelona. It’s got such a cool vibe and is known for its vibrant artistic community and alternative scene. If you’re looking for a good time, why not check out Plaza del Sol (Sun square) or Plaza de la Vila de Gracia (Gracia town square)? There are so many interesting stores and bars to explore in the area – have you heard of the music bar Maria? It’s a hidden gem! And don’t forget to take a stroll through the charming streets – you never know what you might discover.

Gracia
Plaça del Sol
Sun square

Plaça del Sol (Sun square) in Gracia

Have you heard of the Gracia Festival in Barcelona? It’s a super fun week-long street party in the Gracia neighborhood every August. One of the coolest things about the festival is its colorful and lively nature. The streets are decorated with incredible decorations made by the neighborhood’s residents. Plus, many parades, concerts, and other fun events happen throughout the week. It’s definitely a must-see if you’re ever in Barcelona in August!

We hope you found this information interesting and useful.This post will be updated soon with new places to visit in Barcelona. Feel free to leave your comments below.

Top 10 English sayings

Most important English sayings with their meaning
Most common English sayings. Most Usual English Sayings

Face it, if you’re here, it’s because you’re a bit of a language freak. That’s okay. So are we… But before getting into the nitty-gritty, let’s see what a saying is and how it differs from a proverb or an idiom. A saying is any concisely written or spoken expression that is especially memorable because of its meaning or style. Sayings are categorized as follows: Aphorism: a general, observational truth; “a pithy expression of wisdom or truth “. Some examples of popular sayings in English include “slow and steady wins the race,”” you can’t judge a book by its cover,” and “actions speak louder than words.”

What is the difference between a proverb, a saying, and an idiom?

A proverb is a short, traditional saying that offers advice or expresses a universal truth. A saying is a simple, often colloquial expression that memorably conveys a message. An idiom is a phrase or expression with a symbolic meaning that differs from the words’ literal meaning. While all three can be used to convey wisdom or insight, they each have their distinct characteristics and uses.

10 most common sayings in English

Having made the previous clarifications, let’s get down to business. Here are the 10 most used sayings in the English language along with their meaning:

Better late than never. – It’s better to do something late than not at all

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Two wrongs don’t make a right – If someone does something bad to you, it doesn’t make it right for you to do something bad back

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Birds of a feather flock together – Similar People tend to spend time together. A picture is worth a thousand words – A picture can convey more information than words alone.

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There’s no such thing as a free lunch – Nothing is truly free; everything has a cost.

There's no such thing as a free lunch
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Beggars can’t be choosers – If you’re in a difficult situation and someone offers you help, you can’t be picky about what kind of help you receive.

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A penny for your thoughts

A penny for your thoughs
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Actions speak louder than words – What people do is more important than what they say.

Actions speak louder than words
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Don’t count your chickens before they hatch – Don’t assume that something will happen before it actually does.

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You can’t have your cake and eat it too – You can’t have everything you want; sometimes you must make choices

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Other famous English sayings

Some of the most commonly used English sayings are also:

You can’t judge a book by its cover

When the going gets tough, the tough get going. – When things become difficult, strong people take action.

When the going gets tough, the tough get going
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An apple a day keeps the doctor away

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Add insult to injury; All good things must come to an end; All in good time; Curiosity killed the cat or Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

About this blog…

And this is the end of our publication. If you liked it, visit Most Common English Idioms, Most Common English Idioms II, Scottish Proverbs, Most Important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs Translated to English, Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II, and Common British English expressions translated to Catalan. You will find them all in this blog (take a look at the recent posts column on the left). So, if you like typical expressions, idioms, proverbs and sayings, see you here. You know what they say: birds of a feather flock together.
We have no doubt that you will find surprising things on this blog. If you want to share more proverbs with us, please send them to us in the comments section below. Thanks for visiting our blog, and see you soon!

Rarest and most expensive 50p coins

The rarest, most expensive and most coveted 50 pence coins. British coins. Most sought-after 50p.

What is numismatics?

Numismatics is the study of coins and related objects, such as medals, tokens, banknotes, etc. It is a complementary science to archaeology, as it allows to know the history of civilizations and the importance of ancient coins from a religious and political point of view. It also has to do with design, art, even cryptography and, needless to say, economics. Numismatics can also be a hobby for collectors who seek rare or valuable coins.

History of the 50 pence coin

The 50 pence coin is one of the most beautiful coins ever made in Britain and Europe. So much so that thousands of people collect them. You don’t need a big budget to collect these nice coins, and it is a very good way to get into the world of numismatics and coin collecting. Besides, as we will see later, there are some 50 pence coins that are especially appealing for kids. The 50 pence coin is a denomination of British currency worth half pound. It was introduced in 1969 as part of the decimalisation of the British currency system, replacing the old 10-shilling note.

10-shilling note
banknote

50 pence coins replaced the old 10-shilling note

The 50 pence coin has a seven-sided shape, which makes it distinctive from other coins in circulation. It also has a plain edge, unlike the smaller coins which have milled edges.

50 pence coin war
50p coin

The obverse of the 50 pence coin features the profile of the current monarch, who has changed five times since the coin’s introduction. The first portrait was of Queen Elizabeth II, designed by Arnold Machin. It was followed by portraits by Raphael Maklouf (1985), Ian Rank-Broadley (1998), Jody Clark (2015) and Martin Jennings (2022). The last portrait is of King Charles III, who succeeded his mother Queen Elizabeth II after her death in 2022.

The reverse of the 50 pence coin has changed many times over the years, featuring different designs to commemorate various events, people and organisations. Some of the most famous designs include:

The Britannia design by Christopher Ironside, which was used from 1969 to 2008. It shows a seated Britannia alongside a lion, symbolising Britain’s strength and heritage.

50 pence coin Britannia
50p coin


The Royal Shield design by Matthew Dent, which was used from 2008 to 2021. It shows a segment of the Royal Shield, which forms part of the coat of arms of the United Kingdom.

50 pence
royal shield
coat of Arms


The Coronation design by Jody Clark, which was used from 2022 onwards. It shows a copy of the design used on the 1953 Crown struck to commemorate Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation. It includeshe four quarters of the Royal Arms depicted within a shield, and an emblem of each home nation between them.

A highly collectible coin

The 50 pence coin is one of the most popular and collectable coins in Britain, with many different designs issued over the years for both circulation and commemoration. Some of the rarest and most valuable designs include:

The most expensive 50p coins

The Kew Gardens design by Christopher Le Brun, which was issued in 2009 to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. Only 210,000 coins were minted, making it the scarcest and most expensive 50 pence coin in circulation. The kew Gardens 50p coin circulated (average condition) is worth £65.00, in circulated excellent condition is worth £115.00 and uncirculated is worth £230.00.It is important to note that the value of coins varies according to demand and their state of preservation. You can find more information about the Kew Gardens coin on the Royal Mint website.

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Kew Gardens 50p coin

The Olympic Games designs by various artists, which were issued from 2010 to 2011 to celebrate the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. There were 29 different designs, each representing a different sport or discipline. Some of them are more sought-after than others, such as the football design by Neil Wolfson, which shows the offside rule.The Peter Rabbit design by Emma Noble, which was issued in 2016 to mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of Beatrix Potter.

50 pence coin
Peter Rabbit
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It shows the famous character from her children’s books. It was part of a series of four coins featuring other characters such as Jemima Puddle-Duck and Mrs Tiggy-Winkle.


The 50 pence coin is legal tender for amounts up to £10 when offered in repayment of a debt. However, this is not normally relevant for everyday transactions, as most shops and businesses accept any amount of coins as payment. There are approximately 920 million 50 pence coins in circulation as of March 2013.

Ranking

Here is the ranking of the most sought-after —and expensive— 50 pence coins:

CoinYearDesignPrice in poundsPrice in euros
50p2009Kew Gardens£140€164
50p2011Olympic Wrestling£13€15
50p2011Olympic Football£13€15
50p2011Olympic Judo£10€12
50p2011Olympic Triathlon£10€12
50p2016Jemima Puddle-Duck (Beatrix Potter)£8€9
50p2011Olympic Weightlifting£8€9
50p2023*Royal Shield (Charles III) Not issued yet£7€8

We hope you found this post interesting. If you collect 50 pence coins and would like to share your experience with us or give your opinion, please do so in the comments box below. Thank you!

How to Make robots pay taxes, Social Security and Universal Basic Income

Robots. Social Security. Welfare State.
Universal Basic Income (UBI)
Taxes

Will robots ever pay taxes? It may sound like science fiction, but this debate is already on the table. Some people even go so far as to say that they will contribute decisively to the so-called Universal Basic Income (UBI).

The Universal Basic Income (UBI) is a socio-political policy proposal in which all citizens of a country receive a legally stipulated and equally established economic subsidy. A basic income can be implemented at a national, regional or local level.

It is worth saying that here we understand robots in their broadest sense: from computers equipped with artificial intelligence and powerful algorithms to androids such as Boston Dynamics or Honda’s Asimo.

During the industrial revolution, employees worked long hours on the assembly line, which was a dull and unskilled task. But does it make any sense in the 21st century?

In the future it is more than likely that many jobs will still require humans; specially those jobs that involve a human touch (teachers, social educators, therapists, psychologists…) or that have an artistic or creative aspect (designers, craftsmen, painters, writers, artists in general…).

In fact, there is a website that tells you what the chances are that your job will end up being replaced by a robot, namely, Will robots take my job?

To calm us all down a bit, new jobs and positions will emerge that don’t even exist yet.

However, robots with increasingly sophisticated algorithms will eventually replace more and more human workers to do any task that can be turned into algorithms. A cashpoint or ATM replaces an average of 6 workers in a bank branch; Wall Mart replaced its accountants with computers, algorithms rule finances, and we are used to seeing more robots than humans on assembly lines.

The crux of the matter is finding a win-win-win formula that works for everyone: workers who will be replaced by robots, the robots themselves, and the employers.

But is this even possible?

A groundbreaking proposal has emerged from the Blockchain community: What if robots paid taxes, our Social Security and UBI in cryptocurrencies?

The system would work like this:

  1. The robots would do their work, for which they would receive a salary in digital currencies; 🤖🟡🟡🟡
  2. then robots would allocate one third of their salary to pay for their maintenance, another 1/3 would go straight to the citizens’ wallet (the aforementioned Universal Basic Income), and finally, 1/3 would go to Social Security 👨‍👩‍👧‍👧🟡🟡🟡
  3. people could pay for goods and services, among other things, with such Universal Basic Income (UBI). 👨‍👩‍👧‍👧🟡🟡🟡🚙🏖👠
  4. business owners would benefit from this system and be able to reinvest and keep on providing goods and services to citizens. 👩‍💻 🟡🟡🟡

    It looks like a virtuous cycle: entrepreneurs can sell their products, citizens have an income every month and robots pay for their maintenance, UBI and Social Security. Those who want to have a higher standard of living can continue to work to supplement their UBI. Cryptocurrencies that generate the by-product known as ‘gas’ or other even other digital currencies or assets could also be used for this purpose.

It may take some getting used to, but we’re already used to vending machines, ATMs and talking to Siri or Cortana, our virtual assistants, not to mention Chat GPT.

It sounds like a brilliant win-win-win formula that could turn a future often seen as dystopian into an alternative one where people would enjoy more free time. After all, robots perform boring and repetitive tasks that we humans usually don’t like doing.

Robot drawn by Artificial Intelligence (AI)
Robot painted by Artificial Intelligence (AI)
Robot created by Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Robot drawn by Artificial Intelligence (AI)

It would be a great breakthrough in technology and a turning point in human history, both in social and technological terms. Whether this is just unfounded speculation or a serious proposal, it remains to be seen. Stranger things have happened.

Medieval Catalan coins: the Croats

Medieval Coins. Croat. Catalan Coins, Silver. Numismatics.

Medieval coins of Catalonia

Here is one of the most sought-after Catalan coins: the medieval Croats. The medieval croats and the banknotes issued by the Generalitat de Catalunya —the Government of Catalonia— during the Civil War —although the latter, to be more accurate, would fall into the world of note collecting known as notaphily— are the Holy Grail of Catalan numismatics. Yes, there is a great deal of interest in these pieces, and in recent years they have gone up in price at both auctions and numismatics.

History

The Quatern was a Catalan vellon coin created by Peter II in 1212. It was also known as Court coin. Its value was four silver marks and eight copper marks.

In 1346 Peter III the Ceremonious created a new coin: the gold Florin of Aragon , and established a mint in Perpignan for the minting of royal gold coins . It was minted imitating of those of Florence. In addition to Perpignan, it was also minted in Barcelona, Gerona, Valencia and Majorca, but never in Aragon.


The Croat was a Barcelona silver coin, minted from the time of Peter II (1177 – 1213) until Philip V (1683-1746). It was also called Barcelonese silver money, real silver money and thick white coin. Its name comes from the cross on the back. It was abolished in 1718 with the New Royal Decree .

The Counts of Barcelona gradually extended their dominion and currency throughout Catalonia.
The seca (mint) in Barcelona minted coins called Diners and Obols, which had less and less silver content.
It was in the time of James I, the Conqueror, that the stability of the numerarie was achieved. The numeraire is liquid or cash money, i.e. coins, banknotes and short-term current accounts. The numeraire also usually refers to the amount of circulating money (mainly coins and banknotes) that exists in a country at any given time.

The first attempt to make a strong silver coin struck in Barcelona dates back to 1268, but it could not be made due to the opposition of the nobles of Barcelona.

The famous Barcelona coin, called the Croat, was first struck in the first week of August 1285, and it was Peter II, the Great, son of James I, the Conqueror, who ordered it to be issued.
The birth of the Catalan Croat is associated with the period of expansion of the Catalan-Aragonese Crown.

The obverse shows the bust of the king who decided to strike the coins, always looking to the left and with a crown on his head. The reverse of the coin shows the long-armed cross, which is the origin of the old name ‘crucesigneds’ and later the Croat.

The weight of the croat was 3.23 grams of silver.

Medieval silver coins
Catalonia
Catalan Croats

How many grams are an ounce?

To put this in context, one ounce equals 28.35 grams.

Peter II the Great (1276-1285)

The first legal issues of croats began in the first week of August 1285, a few months before the death of Peter II the Great (who reigned from 1276 to 1285 and was the son of James I the Conqueror and Violant of Hungary). Very few examples of croats from this reign are known and therefore are extremely rare.

Peter II Croat

Price

It is a rare croat, and the starting price at auction is 750€, easily reaching 3000€.

It must be said that there are croats that are much more affordable than those of Peter II. For example, a croat of James II (1291-1327) has a starting price of around €80 and is sold for €216 in VF, VF20 or VF25 (according tothe sheldon coin grading scale). A croat of Peter III can be obtained for little more than €80.

For those of you who are already familiar with coin collecting, you already know that the condition of the coin has a direct impact on its price. However, sometimes there are coins that are so unique that their condition takes a back seat.

Roast someone

to roast someone meaning, examples
To roast someone in other languages

Meaning

to roast someone means to admonish, criticize severely or speak angrily and vigorously to someone.

Roast someone examples

You are late for work for the fourth time this week; your boss will really roast you this time.

Wow! She has roasted him in front of everybody. If she wanted to air their dirty laundry, she could’ve done it in private.

Roast someone in Bulgarian

In Bulgarian, if we want to roast someone, we should say дразня (pronounced draznja) (literally, to tease).

Roast someone in Catalan

In Catalan you can say dir el nom del porc (a algú) (literally, to tell the name of the pig (to someone)’

Rast someone in Dutch

In Dutch, the equivalent to roast is het vuur aan de schenen leggen (nl) (literally, put the fire to the shins).

Roast someone in German

In German, an equivalent expression is rüffeln (literally to ruffle).

Roast someone in French

 In French we would use the expression s’en prendre à qn (literally, to attack sb).

Roast someone in Japanese

In Japanese is 酷評する( kokuhyō suru) (literally, to criticize).

Roast someone in Russian

In Russian, a similar expression is задираться (ru) impf (pronounced zadiratʹsja) (informal) (literally, to bully), цапаться (ru) impf (pronounced capatʹsja) (informal)

Roast someone in Spanish

In Spanish (from Spain), in a colloquial way, you say echar un rapapolvo (literally, to throw a scold to someone) or poner verde a alguien (literally, to put green to somebody, although in this second meaning normally the criticized person is not present).

That’s all folks!

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Slow and steady wins the race in other languages

Slow and steady wins the race meaning, origin and translations

Meaning

Slow but steady wins the race is a proverb that means slow, productive progress leads to success. Patient work will eventually overcome any problem or challenge.

Origin

Originated from one of Aesop’s Fables, The Tortoise and the Hare.

The story concerns a Hare who ridicules a slow-moving Tortoise. Tired of the Hare’s arrogant behaviour, the Tortoise challenges him to a race. The hare soon leaves the tortoise behind and, confident of winning, takes a nap midway through the race. When the Hare awakes, however, he finds that his competitor, crawling slowly but steadily, has arrived before him.

Slow and steady wins the race in Catalan

A poc a poc i bona lletra (literally, Little by little and good handwriting)

Slow and steady wins the race in Arabic

من تأنى أدرك ما تمنى (Literally, He who doesn’t rush, gets wherever he wants)

Slow and steady wins the race in Basque

Azkar heldu nahi baduk, astiro joan (Literally, If you want to get in time, go slowly)

Slow and steady wins the race in Chinese

欲速則不達 (zh) (literally, Haste is not enough), 欲速则不达 (zh) (yù sù zé bù dá), 心急吃不了熱豆腐 (zh), 心急吃不了热豆腐 (zh) (xīnjí chībuliǎo rè dòufu, literally, More haste less speed), 不怕慢,只怕站 (bù pà màn, zhǐ pà zhàn) (literally, Not afraid of slowness, just standing)

Slow and steady wins the race in Finnish

kilpikonna voittaa jäniksen (the turtle beats the hare)

Slow and steady wins the race in French

Qui trop se hâte, reste en chemin (literally, Who hurries too much, stays on the way), also Rien ne sert de courir, il faut partir à point (literally, there is no point in running, you have to leave on time)

Slow and steady wins the race in Galician

A gran présa, gran vagar (literally, In a hurry, great wandering)

Slow and steady wins the race in German

Eilen kommt spät ans Ende (literally, Hurry is in the end late)

Slow and steady wins the race in Italian

Chi va piano va sano e va lontano (literally, Who goes slowly goes far)

Slow and steady wins the race in Latin

Festinare nocet ( literally, rushing hurts)

Slow and steady wins the race in Polish

kropla drąży skałę (pl) (literally, drop drills Rock)

Slow and steady wins the race in Portuguese

Devagar e sempre (literally, Slow and always)

Slow and steady wins the race in Scottish Gaelic

Ruigidh each mall muileann (literally, A slow horse will reach a mill)

Slow and steady wins the race in Spanish

 A gran prisa, gran vagar (literally, In great haste, great wander)

This post will be updated shortly. Thank you for your visit! We hope you liked this post.

Other posts that you might like to read are:

(to) Pull one’s chestnuts out of the fire
Bend over backwards in other languages
Every cloud has a silver lining in other languages
Jeepers creepers!
Animal idioms
That’s a different kettle of fish
Most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English
Common British English expressions
Common British English expressions II

Fussy, fusspot and fussbudget in other languages

Typical expressions, idioms

Meaning of Fussy, fusspot and fussbudget (US)

A fussy, fusspot or fussbudget person is someone who gives excessive or anxious concern about details and worries or complains about unimportant things. They sometimes may be a pain in the ass.

Examples of Fusspot

She’s so fussy about the wedding! – everything has to be absolutely perfect.

This technician is a fusspot, but his films come out impeccably edited.

He is a fussy eater.

Origin of Fusspot

It comes from fuss (to worry or complain about trifles), of uncertain origin, perhaps an echoic word. Earliest documented use in 1921.

Fusspot in Catalan

Fussy, fusspot and fussbudget in Catalan

Fusspot in French

Fusspot is pinailleur or difficil in French . A more derogatory French term is chiant.

fussy fusspot fussbudget in French

Fusspot in Spanish

In Spanish (from Spain), Fusspot is tiquismiquis .

titismiquis perepunyetes in Spanish perepunyetes in Spanish

Learn Catalan with couch Polyglot

Catalan language

Learn Catalan (1) | Slow Catalan phrases for beginners

Catalan is an important language ​​in the European Union, with more speakers than Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Greek, Czech and Hungarian. Unfortunately, it still does not have the institutional support it deserves, and in spite of the difficulties, today it is alive and kicking thanks to the people that love it. Since there is an increasing number of people all over the world who start studying this beautiful and interesting Latin language, here is a Youtube channel by Laura Homs we strongly recommend: Couch Polyglot (click here to visit the channel)

Couch Polyglots

Catalan evolved from Vulgar Latin in the Middle Ages around the eastern Pyrenees. Nineteenth-century Spain saw a Catalan literary revival,culminating in the early 1900s.

Since the Spanish transition to democracy (1975–1982), Catalan has been institutionalized as an official language, language of education, and language of mass media; all of which have contributed to its increased prestige. In Catalonia, there is an unparalleled large bilingual European non-state linguistic community.

As the channel information reads: Welcome, Willkommen, Bienvenu, Bienvenido, benvingut, benvenuto, Добро пожаловать! This channel is all about language learning. You will find useful tips and challenges, as well as learning material for Spanish, Catalan and German. The videos are in different languages and all non-English videos include subtitles. The Spanish and Catalan videos also include a transcription so that you can read along if needed. Have fun and hope to see you around. Do you want to know more about me? You can find me on Udemy: https://www.udemy.com/user/laura-homs-2/

Frequently Asked Questions about Catalonia

Most frequently asked questions about Catalonia on the internet. Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by internet users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

Top Google searches about Catalonia, Catalan language and Catalan people answered!

>>> Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by internet users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity. <<<

What is people wondering about Catalonia? What concerns do people around the world have about Catalunya (Catalan word for Catalonia)? What are they searching for about Catalans? Here are the most frequent search terms related to Catalonia, Catalan language and Catalans.

As you may imagine, many of these questions revolve around Catalonia’s independence movement (and we defend the right of both sides to have their say and think that the best way to settle this issue is by means of a democratic, transparent and peaceful referendum), but not all of them. So, without further ado, let’s try to answer the main questions people wonder about Catalan people and Catalonia:

Why Catalonia wants Independence?

There are a number of reasons given by the pro-independence activists for self-determination. There are fiscal reasons —Catalonia suffers from an obvious fiscal deficit and suffers a serious fiscal plundering; besides, it has a serious lack of investment from the Spanish State. In other words: Catalonia is giving much more than it gets back and can’t cover its investment and social needs—; there are a number of cultural reasons too —Catalonia has its own language, culture, literature, music and traditions, which can’t get the recognition and support they deserve—; administrative and emotional reasons —many Catalans feel Catalan, but not Spanish and consider that Spain is mistreating and has mistreated Catalonia throughout history. On the other hand, it must be said that many Catalans also feel Spanish. El Punt Avui (a Catalan newspaper) offers an interesting article on the topic: 100 reasons for independence

Why should Catalonia be independent?

Advocates of an independent Catalonia adduce the reasons described in the previous question “Why Catalonia wants Independence?”

Why Catalonia is not Spain?

It is another frequently asked question on the internet. Supporters of continuing to be united with Spain will say that Catalonia is Spain and supporters of independence will argue the reasons described in the first question “Why Catalonia wants Independence?”.

Why Catalonia wants independence from Spain?

Catalans who are for the independence of Catalonia want to become independent for the reasons given in the first question in this section, namely, “Why Catalonia wants Independence?”.

Why Catalonia wants independence? Quora

As you can see, there are many variants on the same question. Again, Catalans who are for independence want to become independent for the reasons given in the first question of this section, namely “Why Catalonia wants Independence?”. Here is the Quora answer to this question.

Why Catalonia should not be independent

The main reason given by unionists is that declaring independence is unconstitutional. So far, there has not been a counteroffer from the Spanish State (e.g. giving Catalonia a better treatment). Besides, Catalans are still suffering repression, with political prisoners and exiles (including artists) and constants threats. Under this circumstances it is difficult to give an answer to this question, but some Spanish newspapers have published some articles giving their reasons against independence. On Debatingeurope you can find arguments for and against Catalonia Independence.

Why Catalonia wants Independence?

Catalans who are for the independence of Catalonia want to become independent for the reasons given in the first question in this section, namely, “Why Catalonia wants Independence?”.

Are Catalan and Occitan the same language?

Catalan and Occitan are not the same language. Here are two interesting articles (the first in English and the second in Catalan) on the subject: Catalan and Occitan: one diasystem, two languages; Català i occità: un diasistema, dues llengües

Are Catalan and Basque provinces of Spain?

First of all, Catalan and Basque are languages, not provinces; and in any case Catalonia and the Basque Country or Euskadi are, from an administrative viewpoint, Autonomous Communities. They are considered to be ‘historical nationalities’.

The terms nationalities and historical nationalities,though never officially defined, refer to territories whose inhabitants have a strong historically constituted identity; or, more specifically, certain autonomous communities whose Statute of Autonomy—their basic institutional legislation—recognizes their historical and cultural identity.

Even though it is explicitly understood that the term refers to Galicia, the Basque Country, and Catalonia,the constitution does not specify any communities by name.

Are Catalan and Basque the same?

No, by a long shot. They are two languages ​​with different origins and different influences. Catalan is a Romance language that comes from Latin and is official or co-official in Catalonia, Valencia, Andorra, the Balearic Islands and recognised as a minority language in Alghero (Sardinia, Italy), Aragon (Spain) and Pyrénées-Orientales (France). Catalan language is regulated by Institut d’Estudis Catalans and Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua. On the other hand, Basque, which is a linguistic treasure, is unrelated to any other European language and is isolated from any other known living language. The Basques primarily inhabit the Basque Country, tehn France and Navarra. The Basque language or Euskara is regulated by an institution called Euskaltzaindia. Whereas Basque is spoken by 1,180,000 speakers (both native and passive speakers), Catalan is spoken by 10 million people (both native and passive speakers).

Are Catalan and Valencian the same language?

A Catalan and a Valencian speakers understand each other perfectly well. Some localisms, typical expressions, and verb endings may slightly differ, but according to most linguists, such distinction is based on political reasons rather than on language criteria.

Are Catalan and Spanish mutually intelligible

Despite being both Romance languages, if a monolingual Spanish speaker who can’t understand Catalan and a monolingual Catalan who can’t understand Spanish (the latter would be extremely difficult to find) began a conversation, they would probably understand some words, but they would find it difficult to understand each other. Many words have nothing to do (e.g. table Spanish is “Mesa” and in Catalan “Taula”, bird in Spanish is “pájaro”, but in Catalan is “ocell”, strawberry in Spanish is “pájaro” and in Catalan it is “ocell”…) and many syntactic constructions differ. The answer is that unless both speakers know other Latin languages, they would find it difficult to understand each other, and many things would be lost in translation. The reality is that all Catalans understand Spanish. Maybe it would be easier for the monolingual Spanish speaker to understand a Portuguese speaker.

Are Catalan and Spanish similar?

In plain words so that a foreigner can quickly understand it: they are as similar as Spanish and Portuguese. Many words, sounds and syntactic structures are quite different. Catalan language has more phonemes than Spanish.

Are Catalan sheepdogs hypoallergenic?

We didn’t expect that question. As far as we know, and according to Dogbreedplus, Catalan sheepdogs are not hypoallergetic.

Catalonia which country?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by internet users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

We have transcribed the question verbatim. It is one of the most frequently asked questions. Many Catalans consider Catalonia to be a country, but administratively speaking, it currently belongs to the Kingdom of Spain.

Which countries recognise Catalonia?

We assume that this question was asked in the context of the Declaration of Independence. While it is not possible to speak of explicit support (few countries have had it before gaining independence), the partially recognized, non-UN-member states Abkhazia and South Ossetia claimed they were willing to offer formal recognition should they receive a request to do so from the Catalan government.

Which countries support Catalonia?

See the previous question “Which countries recognise Catalonia?”

What parts of catalonia are in lockdown

The Health Channel of the Government of Catalonia (Canal Salut de la Generalitat de Catalunya) is probably the most official and updated source to answer this question.

How did Catalonia become part of Spain?

Ferdinand’s 1469 marriage to Isabella I of Castile brought about a dynastic union of the Crown of Aragon with Castile.

Catalonia how to say

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

We remind you that these are textual questions that people google about Catalonia and the Catalan language. So the heading is written exactly like the search terms people use on the internet. As for this question and from what we could gather, people searching this term want to know how to pronounce Catalonia in Catalan. So here it is:

(/ˌkætəˈloʊniə/; Catalan: Catalunya [kətəˈluɲə]; Occitan: Catalonha [kataˈluɲɔ]; Spanish: Cataluña [kataˈluɲa])

How is Catalan pronounced?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

This is the literal question many people type on the browser’s search box, so here is the answer:

How is Catalonia different from Spain?

Catalonia has its own language, its own traditions, its own literature and, in former days, even its own sovereign institutions. It also shares traditions and has many ties with Spain, France and other Mediterranean countries.

How did Catalonia (Catalunya) independence start?

There is a fair amount of consensus about the fact that current independence movement began in 2010 when the Constitutional Court of Spain ruled that some of the articles of the 2006 Statute of Autonomy—which had been agreed with the Spanish government and passed by a referendum in Catalonia—were unconstitutional, and others were to be interpreted restrictively. Here is a BBC post on the topic.

Will

Will Catalonia ever be independent?

Nobody knows, but here is an interesting article about it: Will Catalonia ever win independence?

According to this article, “To outsiders, the situation is bleaker for Catalan independence. The Guardian reports that the movement has “lost momentum” since the referendum and “any answers to the Catalan question are likely to remain as elusive as ever”.

Will Catalonia someday be independent? Reddit

See previous question.

Will Catalonia lockdown?

To follow the latest news on lockdown in Catalonia, we recommend you visit the official website of the Catalan Government (Generalitat) Home Department: Ministry of Home Affairs

Will independence of Catalonia ever happen?

See previous questions.

Will Catalonia become a State?

Many claim that Catalonia is already a country without a state, but nobody can tell whether it will become a State or not.

Will Catalonia secede from Spain?

Nobody knows. Stranger things have happened. In any case, in the event of independence, there will be no borders and the only thing that would change is that Catalonia would govern itself and manage its own affairs and resources.

When will Catalonia be released?

Who knows? Maybe some day, maybe never. What is clear is that independence advocates want to do it in a democratic and participatory way, letting people have their say, vote in a referendum and decide peacefully.

Can Catalonia be independent?

There are compelling reasons to think that Catalonia would do very well as an independent state. All the small states of Western Europe are prosperous, and Catalonia has an ideal geographical location, a very active entrepreneurial fabric and a Gross Domestic Product which, if Catalonia could manage its resources, it would probably make the little country a sort of “southern Denmark”. According to Nobel Prize winner Joseph E. Stiglitz an independent Catalonia would be economically viable.

Can Catalonia survive without Spain?

Advocates for independence have no doubt whatsoever. Those who are for the union with Spain don’t offer many economic counterarguments. In any case, Catalonia is a prosperous and productive region and a net contributor. According to Catalonia & Trade Investment “Its location in the Mediterranean and its transport infrastructures, as well as its trading, entrepreneurial and open economy have made Catalonia a top rank strategic position in the south of Europe with Barcelona as an unbeatable meeting point for international business”.

From an economic point of view; definitely yes.

Can Bassa Catalunya

As far as we know, Can Bassa is an old farmhouse restored within the walls of fourteenth-century charm, in the pretty village of Madremanya in the Baix Emporda (Costa Brava). 

Can Serola Catalonia

To the best of our knowledge, Can Serola is an 18th century country house where traditional architecture coexists with design, 8 rooms, Ethnic, Indian, Monastic, Classic, Mexican, Moroccan, Zen and African. Located within the Area of Natural Interest of the Alta Garrotxa, near Besalú (Girona), where tranquility and silence reign, in a privileged environment, with total privacy, the mountains, the silence, the stars, the moon and the birds. It is your house.

Catalonia Cancun

As far as we know, Catalonia Cancun is a touris resort on Mayan Riviera.

Can Alemany Catalonia

Can Alemany, formerly known as Mas Salamones during the nineteenth century, is one of the oldest farmhouses in Santa Margarida de Montbui. During the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the expansion of wheat cultivations, and most specifically vineyards, enrich most of the area farms and its heritage.

Can Bosquita Catalonia

As far as we are aware, Can Bosquita is a rural house on the Brave Coast.

Who owns Catalonia Hotels?

Today the company is led by the Vallet brothers, Manuel, Guillermo and Alfonso and has 64 establishments in 18 different destinations

Who recognises Catalonia?

See “Which countries recognise catalonia”

Who supports Catalonia?

While some famous people, institutions and countries without a state support Catalan independence, the referendum proposal enjoys a broader consensus.

Who is the President of Catalonia?

Many Catalans say the legitimate president of Catalonia is Carles Puigdemont i Casamajó, who is currently in exile. His successor Joaquim Torra i Pla was ousted for denouncing the existence of political prisoners and exiles. The sitting president is, as of Today, Pere Aragonès García. Many Catalan presidents have suffered political persecution and even execution* throughout history.

Lluís Companys i Jover, who served as president of Catalonia from 1934 and during the Spanish Civil War, went into exile in France after the war and was captured and handed over by the Nazi secret police, the Gestapo, to the Spanish State of Francisco Franco, who had him executed by firing squad in 1940

Who supports Catalonia independence?

Many Scottish, Irish and Flemish politicians explicitly support the Catalan cause. Some famous people around the world and countries without a state support the right of Catalans to self-determination as an inalienable, integral and indivisible part of universal human rights. While some famous people, institutions and countries without a state support Catalan independence, the referendum proposal enjoys a broader consensus. Those who oppose the right to self-determination, argue that it would be unconstitutional.

Who is Eva Parera?

Eva Parera is a Spanish lawyer and politician.

Who is Catalonia in Spain?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

Catalonia is currently an Autonomous Community (in Spanish Comunidad Autónoma and in Catalan Comunitat Autònoma) in Spain. An Autonoumous Community is a first-level political and administrative division, created in accordance with the Spanish constitution of 1978, with the aim of guaranteeing limited autonomy of the nationalities and regions that make up Spain

Who is behind the Catalonia independence movement?

It is a cross-generational grassroots movement made up by many Catalan people, cultural and civic organizations and a wide range of political organisations. Catalans are friendly, open-minded and love democracy and fundamental rights. Catalans, diverse as they may be, feel very proud of their culture and history and have a long record of resisting repression and fighting against absolutism and fascism.

The Catalan pro-independence movement is an inclusive, grass-roots, radically democratic movement that brings together people from all walks of life and different ideologies who agree upon two principles: Catalan people deserve the right to decide their own future and fundamental rights must be guaranteed.

When did Catalonia become part of Spain?

Ferdinand’s 1469 marriage to Isabella I of Castile brought about a dynastic union of the Crown of Aragon with Castile.

When did Catalonia unite with Spain?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

See previous question

When will Catalonia be released?

As long as the Spanish state blocks a peaceful and democratic referendum on the issue and doesn’t put an end to the crackdown on dissenting politicians and artists, it will be hard under such repressive conditions.

When was Catalonia independent?

At the end of the 8th century, most of the Iberian Peninsula was controlled by the Emirate of Cordova. It was during this period that the Marca Hispanica was set up, an administrative unit integrated into Charlemagne’s Frankish Empire and in which a large part of the territories that ended up forming Catalonia were brought together. Consequently, its origin is linked to the most powerful Christian state of the time, which extended to central Europe, the Carolingian Empire.


Such territories were divided into the counties of Pallars-Ribagorça, Urgell-Cerdanya, Rosselló, Empúries, Girona and Barcelona. They ​​enjoyed a sufficiently autonomous power and their relationship of vassalage with the Frankish monarchy was in appearance only, since, in fact, the counts could develop their own foreign policy and establish diplomatic contacts with the caliphs of Cordova and the Roman pontifical court. 

During the 9th century, the counts undertook a policy of repopulation of those areas destroyed by the struggles against the Muslims and strengthened their power to acquire a degree of sovereignty over the Frankish king, often absent and with few means to show his authority.

The count of Barcelona was actually sovereign
There is a second point that also needs to be explained. It has often been considered that Catalonia, being a principality and not a kingdom, had less power or, if you like, a lower rank, or was subject to the Crown of Aragon. In modern times, this confusion was even greater especially when the ancient kingdoms began to be identified with modern states: the kingdom of France, the kingdom of Spain… But in reality, in medieval times the titles to territory, whether they were kingdoms, counties, or marquises, were quite irrelevant, as relations were mostly interpersonal: being king or count was exactly the same in terms of the use and ostentation of power.

Borrell II, who did not renew the oath of allegiance to the Frankish monarchs (Treaty of Corbeil of 1258), was sovereign.

Sapiens magazine offers a good explanation on the topic (in Catalan)

When was Catalonia a Country?

Many argue that Catalonia has always been a country, but for a historical explanation see the previous answer.

When will Catalonia be independent?

As long as the Spanish state blocks a peaceful and democratic referendum on the issue and doesn’t put an end to the crackdown on dissenting politicians and artists, it will be hard under such repressive conditions.

When did Catalonia start fighting for independence?

From the 1850s onwards, various individuals and organisations demanded full independence of Catalonia from Spain. The first organised Catalan independence party was Estat Català (Catalan State), founded in 1922 by Francesc Macià.

Where is Catalonia in France?

The current official category of “Catalans” is that of the citizens of Catalonia, an autonomous community in Spain and the inhabitants of the Roussillon historical region in southern France, today the Pyrénées Orientales department, also called Northern Catalonia and Pays Catalan in French.

Where are Catalonia and Navarra?

Catalonia is an autonomous community on the northeastern corner of Spain, designated as a nationality by its Statute of Autonomy. Navarra is in northern Spain, bordering the Basque Autonomous Community, La Rioja, and Aragon in Spain and Nouvelle-Aquitaine in France.

Where is Catalonia located on Spain map?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

Catalunya where to stay

Here are some interesting websites where you can find nice places to stay in Catalonia:

20 charming places to stay in Catalonia Catalunya
The 10 best Catalonia hotels Catalunya
The 10 best hotels in Catalonia Catalunya

Catalonia where to go

Here are some of the best places to visit in Catalonia:

17 best places to visit in Catalonia
50 Catalonia must-see places
Catalonia Lonely Planet

Catalonia (Catalunya) where is in Spain?

Location of Catalunya (Catalonia) on the map of Spain

Ebro river is spelled Ebre in Catalan

Where is Catalonia Located

Catalonia (/ˌkætəˈloʊniə/; Catalan: Catalunya [kətəˈluɲə]; Occitan: Catalonha [kataˈluɲɔ]; Spanish: Cataluña [kataˈluɲa]) is an autonomous community in Europe, on the northeastern corner of Spain, designated as a nationality by its Statute of Autonomy. Catalonia consists of four provinces: Barcelona, Girona, Lleida, and Tarragona. The capital and largest city, Barcelona is the second-most populated municipality in Spain and the fifth-most populous urban area in the European Union.

Why is Catalonia famous?

Catalonia is famous for its culture (celebrities like Antoni Gaudí, Salvador Dalí, Pau Casals, Charlie Rivel, Montserrat Caballé, Josep Carreras, Mercè Rodoreda, Sergi López, Jordi Savall, Judith Mascó, Úrsula Corberó, Johan Cruyff, Oriol Ripol, Kílian Jornet, Pau and Marc Gasol, Ricky Rubio, Gerard Piqué, Pep Guardiola, Roalía and many others were born in Catalonia), for its open, multicultural and Mediterranean capital city Barcelona, for unique mountains like Montserrat, for Football Club Barcelona, for the Independence movement, for the Brave Coast (Costa Brava)…

What is the issue of Catalonia with Spain about?

The answer to this question depends to a great extend on what side is providing the explanation, so let’s see what impartial international observers have to say: BBC: Catalonia crisis in 300 words.

What happens to Catalonia if it becomes independent?

Many economists claim that, since it could manage its own resources and break free from the fiscal plundering (probably the worst in Europe) Catalonia would be a very prosperous country and could cover almost all of its social needs. It is a fact that in Western Europe small countries tend to be richer. Catalan language —which has more speakers than Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Czech or Hungarian— would finally have the recognition it deserves. Catalonia could have a modern and transparent democracy with a really impartial and independent judiciary. Catalonia could also promote its culture all over the world and be represented in official sport competitions.

For what things is Catalonia known?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

See Why is Catalonia famous?

Catalonia. What to visit.

There are so many things to see in Catalonia, from magnificent landscapes to amazing and unique architecture, picturesque villages, surprising museums, routes, mountains, enotourism, thousand-year-old cities… that you would need a whole life to see and enjoy them all. Here are some websites you may find interesting: https://web.gencat.cat/en/temes/turisme/
http://www.catalunya.com/

Catalunya what to do?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

Here are some good sources on what to do in Catalonia:

Time Out Barcelona
Butxaca Magazine (Barcelona)
Time Out Girona
Time Out Tarragona
Time Out Lleida

Catalonia what is happenning?

Please note that we transcribed the queries just as they are typed on the search engines by users, keeping all the spelling and grammar mistakes to ensure greater authenticity.

Here are some good sources to keep updated about Catalonia:

Ara in English
Catalan News
Catalonia Today
BBC Catalonia
Catalonia EL País

Catalonia what to see

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There are so many things to see in Catalonia, from magnificent landscapes to amazing and unique architecture, picturesque villages, surprising museums, routes, mountains, enotourism, thousand-year-old cities… that you would need a whole life to see and enjoy them all. Here are some websites you may find interesting: Government of Catalonia Tourism ; Catalonia