You know what really grinds my gears

List of the most annoying daily setbacks and nuisances that really grind my gears

(to) grind one’s gears meaning

(to) grind one’s gears is an American English idiom meaning that something or someone makes you angry or annoys you. This idiom was recently popularized by fictional character Peter Griffin, the main character of the American animated sitcom Family Guy.

What really grinds my gears

Here is a list of the everyday situations, setbacks, misfortunes and twists that really grind my gears, or annoy me to such an extreme that really salt my apples or make me blow a fuse, blow a gasket, blow my top… Well, you know what I mean.

You know what really grinds my gears

I’m not a short fuse, I’m not specially quick to temper… but even though they may seem small details, trifles, or if you like, trivialities, they really manage to get on my nerves. Just imagine they all happen the same day… believe me, it could end up badly. Yeah, even a model citizen could end up losing their head and behaving like Michael Douglas in Falling Down.

So, without further ado, let’s take a look at these annoying and inconvenient daily setbacks:

List of things that grind my gears

When you are in bed, as snug as a bug in a rug, and suddenly remember that you left the washing machine on, so you need to get up and hang up clothes.

annoying things
things that really grind my gears
The washing machine!

When the earphone cables get tangled and you need to spend your valuable time untangling the fu***ng mess.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you step on a dog turd when heading to an important appointment or, even worse, a romantic date.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

Spoilers… I just hate them! They should know that loose lips sink ships.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you realize, after taking a shower, you didn’t take the towel (specially annoying in winter).

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When you can’t escape from a smart-ass who happens to be a relative and you run out of painkillers.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
What a drag! What a headache!

When you placidly conclude your digestive process and find out there isn’t any toilet paper left.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
Shit!

When egg yolks pop out when frying. However hard you try to disguise your blunder, everybody will notice.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

When your shoes and, even worse, your socks get wet on a cold and rainy winter day. It only adds insult to injury if you happen to be on your way to work and you are late. You know… It never rains but it pours.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear
Oh, no!

When you forget to save the files you have been working so hard on.

annoying things
things that really grind my gear

What about you? What grinds your gears? Mosquitoes? Rude people? Reckless drivers? Cooking oil spilled out on the kitchen floor? Let us know.

Thank you for you visit. We look forward to seeing you around soon.

Synonyms of (to) grind one’s gears meaning

There are several synonyms of this expressions, such as (to) irritate, (to) annoy, (to) be like a bear with a sore head, (to) blow a fuse, (to) blow a gasket, (to) blow your top, (to be) be cheesed off, (to) drive someone up the wall, (to) fly off the handle, (to) get someone’s goat

(to) Grind one’s gears in other languages

(to) grind one’s gears in Catalan: Treure de polleguera (to) grind one’s gears in French: faire sortir quelqu’un de ses gonds (to) grind one’s gears in German: wahnsinnig machen (to) grind one’s gears in Spanish: sacar de quicio

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Animal idioms

Animal idioms illustrated and translated to Catalan

Ants in one’s pants

(to) be restless, uneasy. Catalan: un sac de nervis (literally, a bag of nerves).

Red herring

A misleading clue or piece of information. Catalan: pista falsa (literally, false clue).

(the) birds and the bees

Sex education. Catalan: la cigonya (literally, the stork)

White elephant

An unwated or annoying possession. Catalan: Regal enverinat (literally, poisoned gift)

… And while we’re at it, some jokes about elephants:

What did the elephant say to a naked man?
Hey that’s cute but can you breath through it?
What’s grey, stands in a river when it rains and doesn’t get wet?
An elephant with an umbrella!
Why does an elephant wear sneakers?
So that he can sneak up on mice!

Cat nap

A short sleep. Catalan: fer una becaina (literally, to take a nap)

As happy as a clam

Very happy. Catalan: content com un gínjol (literally, happy as a jujube).

Fishy

Odd, strange, suspicious. Catalan: (hi ha) gat amagat (literally, there’s a hidden cat here).

While we’re at it, a fish joke:

What did the fish say when he posted bail? “I’m off the hook!”

One trick pony

Someone who has only one ability or good quality . Catalan: there is no equivalent, the literal translation is Poni d’un sol truc.

A different kettle of fish

A completely different thing, topic or subject (very similar to a horse of a different colour). Catalan: figues d’un altre paner (literally, figs from another pannier or basket)

A horse of a different color

A completely different thing, topic or subject (very similar to a different kettle of fish). Catalan: figues d’un altre paner (literally, figs from another pannier or basket).

A guinea pig

Someone used as part of an experiment or trial. Catalan: conillet d’indies)

While we are are it, here is a joke about guinea pigs…

Q: When do guinea pigs run away from rain? A: When its raining cats and dogs!

Weasel out

(to) abandon their responsibility or commitment in a way that is sneaky or cowardly. Catalan: escaquejar-se (colloquial, literally, to cop out).

While we are at it, here is a joke about weasels:

A 13 year old weasel walks into a bar and approaches the counter. The bartender immediately notices the underage weasel.
“Sir, you look extremely young. I can’t serve you even a single beer.”
“Oh c’mon. You can’t just slide me one?”
“Can’t and will not serve to anyone under age.”
“Fine. Well what other things do you have?”
“Well for non-alcoholics I have tap water and bottled water, I have coffee, and I have pop. Which would you like?”
“Pop.” Goes the weasel.

Wouldn’t hurt a fly

A very peaceful and non-violent person. Catalan: No li faria mal a una mosca (literally, wouldn’t hurt a fly).

While we’re at it, here is two jokes about flies:

What is the difference between a fly and a bird? A bird can fly but a fly can’t bird!

What do you call a fly that is ill? Answer: The flew

Mad as a hornet

Extremely angry or upset. Catalan: empipat com una mona (angry as a monkey).

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!

Also Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle! Used to express complete surprise, amazement or disbelief . Catalan: N’hi ha per a llogar-hi cadires (literally, there is to rent chairs!) or Me’n faig creus (literally, I make myself crosses).

A cock-and-bull story

An exaggerated or falsified story or explanation. Catalan: un sopar de duro (literally, a one coin dinner).

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You can’t get blood out of a stone

Meaning. Examples. Equivalents in other languages.

Meaning

You can’t get blood out of a stone or You can’t get blood from a stone means that it is pointless to expect positive results from someone or something that doesn’t have the will, the ability or the resources.

Examples

Persuading Mary to come to the party is like getting blood from a stone.

Getting him to come clean is like trying to get blood out of a stone.

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Catalan

 You can't get blood out of a stone in Catalan

You can’t get blood out of a stone in French

C’est comme se heurter à un mur (literally, It’s like hitting your head against a wall).

You can't get blood out of a stone in French

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Irish Gaelic

Is doiligh olann a bhaint de ghabhar ( literally, it’s hard to get wool off a goat).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in German

Verlorene Liebesmüh  ( literally, Love’s Labour’s Lost).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Italian

Come picchiare un cavallo morto ( literally, It’s like flogging a dead horse) .

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Portuguese

Tirar nabos da púcara ( literally, to throw prickly turnips).

You can’t get blood out of a stone in Spanish

No le pidas peras al olmo (literally, don’t ask for pears to an elm tree)

You can't get blood out of a stone in Spanish

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(to) drive someone bananas

(to) drive someone bananas meaning, synonyms, examples and equivalents in other languages.

Meaning

To drive someone bananas means to drive one crazy or to make someone feel stressed. You can also go bananas if you get angry; or go mad.

Synonyms

(to) grind one’s gears (AmE), get someone’s goat, drive crazy, drive nuts, drive round the bend, give a hard time, harass, tease, irritate, bother, distress, plague, persecute, annoy, trouble, hound, agonize, vex, crucify, torture, harry, harrow, excruciate, nag, punish, bait, break, wring, afflict, worry, pester, provoke, rack, bedevil, try, devil, smite.

to grind one's gears

Examples

All that noise was driving him bananas!

Tom’s acting childish today, it’s driving me bananas.

sb = somebody

(to) drive sb bananas in Catalan

In Catalan it is Treure de polleguera (literally, take out of the hinge).

Drive sb bananas in Catalan
You drive me bananas = Em treus de polleguera

(to) drive sb bananas in French

In French, as in Catalan, it is Faire sortir quelqu’un de ses gonds (literally, pull someone out of their hinges).

Drive sb bananas in French

(to) drive sb bananas in German

In German you say jdn. wahnsinnig machen (literally, to drive crazy)

(to) drive sb bananas in Spanish

In Spanish it is Sacar de quicio (meaning to aggravate or annoy).

Drive sb bananas in many languages
Drive sb bananas in other languages

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Nuts

Nuts meaning, examples, synonyms. Nuts in other languages.

Meaning

Nuts, in a figurative sense, means to be crazy or foolish. You can go nuts (go crazy) or something can drive you nuts (crazy). It also means to be very enthusiastic about something.

nuts to be nuts

Synonyms

Nutcase, crazy, cracked, whacky, batty, moonstruck, loony, barmy (GB), crackers (GB), daft, screwy, mental, maniac, haywire, crackpot, kook (US)

Examples

She went nuts when she won the lottery. He lost all the money just one year after.

I sometimes go nuts when people touch my stuff.

I’m nuts about boardgames, specially Settlers of Catan.

Nuts in Catalan

In Catalan you can say tocat del bolet (literally,touched by a mushroom) for Nuts or estar tocat del bolet for (to) be nuts. You can also say et falta un bull (literally, you lack a boil) or estàs com un llum (literally, you are like a light) or even estàs com una cabra (literally, you are like a goat).

Nuts in Basque language

In Basque language we have a number of choices: burutik eginda egon, (burutik) jota egon, (burutik) eraginda egon, (burutik) ondo egon ez, (burutik) sano egon ez, harrikadea euki/harrikada eduki (hum.), ganbaratik ondo egon ez (hum.), burua pitzatuta eduki, zoratuta egon.

Nuts in French

In French you can say complètement cinglé(e) o complètement à la masse. For example: Mon Dieu, il est complètement cinglé! (OMG, he’s gone completely nuts!)

Nuts in Italian

In Italian, there is the expression Passo. For instance, No, allora sì che crederanno davvero che sono pazzo (Now they will think that I’ve really gone nuts).

Nuts in Irish Gaelic

Depending on the context, in Irish Gaelic nuts can be:

  • as do mheabhair
  • craiceáilte
  • ar mire
  • bailithe

He’s completely nuts: tá sé glan as a mheabhair, tá sé iomlán craiceáilte, tá sé ar mire glan
She went nuts: chaill sí an bloc, spréach sí, chuaigh sí ar mire
It’s driving me nuts: tá sé do mo chur soir, tá sé do mo chur as mo mheabhair

Nuts in German

(to) be nuts in German is Spinnen (informal): (to) go nuts is durchdrehen or anfangen zu spinnen.

Nuts in Scottish Gaelic

In Scots Gaelic, Nuts is Cnóthan (as in nuts/bolts; walnuts etc.) As in crazy/nuts, craicte.

Nuts in Spanish

In Spanish you can say estar como un cencerro (literally, to be like a cowbell). You can also say chiflado (loony, whacky) or estar como una cabra (literally, to be like a goat).

Nuts in Swedish

Nuts is knäpp in Swedish.

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Scottish proverbs

Scottish proverbs translated to English and Catalan

Previously on Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet we posted the most important Catalan Sayings and Proverbs translated to English. A saying is a short, pithy, commonly known expression which generally offers advice or wisdom, and contains truth or value. As everybody knows, Scotland is a beautiful country full of history and folk wisdom. So without further ado, let’s take a look at some delightful Scottish proverbs:

Glasgow from Queen’s Park.

Like father, like son

Scottish Gaelic: Am mac mar an t-athair.
Catalan: De tal pare, tal fill.

Nobody can serve two masters

Scottish Gaelic: Chan urrainn do dhuine ‘sambith seirbhis a dhéanamh do dhà mhaighstir.
Catalan: Ningú pot servir a dos senyors. (literally, Nobody can serve two lords).

A leopard can’t change its spots

Scottish Gaelic: an car a bha san t-seana mhaide ‘s duilich a thoirt às (literally, the twist which is in the old stick is difficult to take out).
Catalan: Cabra avesada a saltar, fa de mal desvesar (literally, A goat used to jump is difficult to unveil).

Every cloud has a silver lining

Scottish Gaelic: tha a’ ghrian air cùlaibh gach sgothan (literally, The sun is behind each boat).
Catalan: Es tanca una porta i s’obre una finestra (literally, a door closes and a window opens) or No hi ha mal que per bé no vingui (literally, there is no evil that does not come for a good purpose).

He who loses his language loses his world

Scottish Gaelic: Am fear a chailleas a chanain caillidh e a shaoghal.
Translation into Catalan: Qui perd el seu idioma, perd el seu món.

It is the milk of the goat foaming and warm, that gave the strength to the past generations of people

Scottish Gaelic: Bainne nan gobhar fo chobhar ’s e blàth, ’s e chuireadh an spionnadh sna daoine a bha
Catalan: És la llet escumosa i calenta de la cabra, la que va donar força a les anteriors generacions.

Do you know any other Scottish proverbs? Tell us! We look forward to your comments and suggestions.

Big fish eat little fish

Scottish Gaelic: A’ bhiast as mutha ag ithe na beiste as lugha.

Catalan: el peix gran es menja el petit.

Although…

What’s meant to happen will happen

Scottish: Whit’s fur ye’ll no go by ye! 

Catalan: El que hagi de passar, passarà.

Many a little makes a mickle

Scottish: Mony a mickle maks a muckle! (Saving a small amount soon builds up to a large amount)

Catalan: De mica en mica s’omple la pica.

Edinburgh
Edinburgh

Don’t try to teach someone something they already know

Scottish: Dinnae teach yer Granny tae suck eggs! 

Catalan: No vulguis ensenyar res a algú que ja en sap.

Thank you for your visit. Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

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That’s a different kettle of fish

Idioms ~That’s a different kettle of fish in other languages

Meaning

(to) be a different kettle of fish refers to a topic or situation which is enterily different from the one that was just being discussed. Synonym: It’s a horse of a different color.

That's a different kettle of fish
It's a horse of a different color
It's a horse of a different color

Examples

… I suppose we could organize a party, but that’s an entirely different kettle of fish, we were discussing about the impact of the economic crisis on the labour market.

However, MPs are something of a different kettle of fish to the MEPs in my view.

That’s a different kettle of fish in Catalan

In Catalan there is the idiom Són figues d’un altre paner (literally, These are figs from another basket).

That's a different kettle of fish in Catalan
idioms

That’s a different kettle of fish in French

In French, the closest equivalent is Une autre paire de manches (literally, another pair of sleeves).

That's a different kettle of fish in French
That’s a different kettle of fish in French: c’est une autre paire de manches.

That’s a different kettle of fish in German

In German it is ein ganz anderes Para Schuhe (literally, These are another pair of shoes).

That's a different kettle of fish in German

That’s a different kettle of fish in Italian

Depending on the context, there are 3 versions in Italian, namely, la cosa cambia aspetto (literally, the thing changes of aspect) , è un altro paio di maniche (literally, that’s another pair of sleeves) o questo è ben altro affare (literally, That’s a completey different matter).

That's a different kettle of fish in Italian

That’s a different kettle of fish in Spanish

In Spanish there is the idiom Eso es harina de otro costal (literally, this is flour from another sack/bag).

That's a different kettle of fish in Spanish

Nuts ~ Tocat del Bolet is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

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Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle

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Scottish Gaelic ⇆ Catalan Simple Greetings

Scots gaelic and Catalan greetings

Greetings in Scots Gaelic and Catalan

Here is a list of the main greetings in Scots Gaelic translated to Catalan language. Scottish Gaelic is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, native to the Gaels of Scotland. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic. One curious fact about Scots Gaelic Gaelic is that it has no words for “yes” (in Catalan, ) and “no” (in Catalan, No), and replies are made with the relevant verbs. For questions beginning with “a bheil?”, the appropriate word for “yes” is “tha”. An alternative is “seadh”, pronounced shugh, which means “yeah” or “uh-huh”. At the end of this post there is a comprehensive list of resources to learn Scottish Gaelic or Catalan.

English > Scots Gaelic (pronunciation) ⇆ Catalan (audio)

Hello > Halò. (ha-LAW) ⇆ Hola

Welcome > fàilte – (faaltshæ) Benvingut

My name is [your name]> Is mise … [your name] ⇆ En dic… [your name]

How are you? > Ciamar a tha thu/sibh? (KEM-mer uh HA oo?) ⇆ Com estàs?

Good morning > madainn mhath (matin vah) ⇆ Bon dia

Good day > latha math (laah mah) ⇆ Bon dia

Good afternoon/evening > feashar math – (fesker mah) ⇆ Bona tarda / vespre

Good night > oidhche mhath – (oychæ vah) ⇆ Bona nit

Bye for now > tiaraidh an dràsda (tsheearee an draasha)Fins ara!

Goodbye > beannachd leibh (byannachk leyv) ⇆ Adéu

Excuse me > gabh mo leisgeul (gav mo leshæl)Perdoni

I am sorry > tha mi duilich (haa mee doolich)Perdó

Thank you > tapadh leibh (tah leyv)Gràcies / Mercès

Many thanks > mòran taing (mohræn tigh -ng)Moltes gràcies

You’re welcome ( Reply to thank you ) > ´s e ur beatha (shey oor behah) ⇆ De res

Gaelic> Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlɪkʲ]  ⇆ Gaèlic · Catalan > Catalanach ⇆ Català

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Scottish Gaelic learners’ materials on the Internet:

Adhartach (Advanced)

  • Clilstore – Videos of authentic and natural (while also clear and relatively simple) conversations with fluent Gaelic speakers, including a transcript with all words linked to online dictionaries
  • BBC Alba iplayer
  • Language Skills – Online literacy for fluent speakers – Course by SCIR, Lews Castle College, on Gaelic Orthographic Conventions
  • Stòras na Gàidhlig aig Foghlam Alba
  • An t-Oide – blog WordPress aig Steaphan MacRisnidh

Dictionaries

Supplements to particular textbooks (Advanced)

E-books – $

Catalan learners’ materials on the Internet:

Intercat

Information about Catalan

Courses and lessons

Gamified lessons & Flashcards(most sites here have mobile apps)

Online dictionaries

Catalan monolingual

Translators

Verb conjugation

Pronunciation


Maps & Images

Interactive Dialect/Pronunciation/Accent maps


MediaOnline radio

Audio

Podcasts

TV

Videos

Films

Anime

You can normally find Catalan dubs of popular anime on YouTube if you search “title + catala”, but they’re frequently removed due to Copyright restriction, so the below links may not work forever.

Songs


TextOnline News

Literature

Comics

Misc

Information on Catalancheck out the ca.wikipedia.org versions of the pages!

Tapadh leibh, Gràcies!

Thank you and see you soon!