Bend over backwards in other languages

to bend over backwards = (to) try one’s hardest, (to) do one’s best.

Meaning

(to) Bend over backwards means to strive hard, to do one’s utmost to achieve something. move heaven and earth. (to) try one’s hardest, (to) do one’s best.

Examples

They have bent over backwards to adapt small business to the new circumstances, and now they are selling online.

John bent over backwards for her sister when she was in trouble.

(to) bend over backwards in Catalan

There is a very idiomatic expresssion in Catalan that means exactly the same: fer mans i mànigues (literally, to do hands and sleeves).

(to) bend over backwards in French

In French, we can say se mettre en quatrese plier en quatre, o se couper en quatre (which literally means to bent backwards)

(to) bend over backwards in German

In German sich ein Bein ausreißen (which literaly means to pluck one’s leg)

(to) bend over backwards in Italian

In Italian it is farsi in quattro (which literally means bent backwards)

(to) bend over backwards in Portuguese

In Portuguese it is fazer de tudo (which literally means “to do everything”)

(to) bend over backwards in Spanish

In Spanish you can say Hacer lo imposible (which literally means to do the impossible)

Microstory ~ The Maslow suicide

Short story
Brief story

The Maslow suicide

He was a total failure, a nobody, a good-for-nothing piece of shit, as his mother, every time she got drunk, reminded him since he was a child .

That’s why he decided to leap into the void.

He didn’t give a shit about anything or anyone, anymore.
The first thing he did wastake all his paintings and tear them apart. Some knowledgeable painting teachers once told him that he had a style of his own, that he somehow managed to convey a profound meaning and bla bla bla. He couldn’t care less.

Then, in this escalation of nihilism, he decided to send emails and messages on social media telling his friends and acquaintances how much he loathed their presence and he even took the trouble to list all the things he hated most about each one, making sure that the message sounded as offensive and personalized as possible.

Then he headed for a war-torn Middle-East country, where security and safety were anything but guaranteed.

Locals say that he stopped drinking, eating and sleeping a year ago, but, oddly enough, he did not die. Instead, he became a sort of self-sufficient being who lives in a higher dimension and cannot be tempted by acknowledgements nor hurt by human wickedness.

***

Tocat del Bolet ~Nuts owns this work’s intellectual property

Everything will be fine in other languages

Catalan, French, Spanish, German, Korean, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Chinese…

Due to the current global coronavirus outbreak, the expression Everything will be fine has become popular, first in Italy, then in Catalonia and Spain. Kids are making drawings on paperboard or linen and hanging them on the balconies or windows. But how can we say this expression in different languages? Here you are:

Everything will be fine in Catalan

Tot anirà bé.

Everything will be fine in Chinese (Mandarin)

一切都会很好

Everything will be fine in French

There are several alternatives in French. These are the most popular:
“Tout va bien se passer”
“Tout ira bien”
“ça va aller”
“ça ira”

Tout va bien se passer Everything will be fine in French

Everything will be fine in Spanish

Todo irá bien

Everything will be fine in German

Alles wird gut!

Everything will be fine in Korean

다 잘될거야

Everything will be fine in Italian

Tutto andrà bene // Andrà tutto bene

everything will be fine in Italian
Andrà tutto bene

Everything will be fine in Japanese

大丈夫だよ

大丈夫だよ Everything will be fine in Japanese

Everything will be fine in Polish

Wszystko będzie dobrze

Everything will be fine in Portuguese

 Tudo ficará bem

 Tudo ficará bem
everything will be fine in Portuguese

Everything will be fine in Russian

все будет хорошо

все будет хорошо Everything will be fine in Russian

Everything will be fine in Swedish

Allt kommer att bli bra

Allt kommer att bli bra Everything will be fine in Swedish

Everything will be fine song in Italian and Catalan:

To conclude, just add that in English you can also say Everything will be ok, everything will be alright, Everything is going to be fine/ok/alright…

So chin up! What can’t be cured must be endured, but remember: every cloud has a silver lining, so for the time being we’ll have to bite the bullet and wait for the calm after the storm.

Every cloud has a silver lining in other languages

Arabic, Basque, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Dutch, Estonian, Galician, German, Greek, Hebrew, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Scottish Gaelic, Swedish, Spanish, Turkish… Every cloud has a silver lining in other languages

Meaning

In every bad situation there is an element of good.

BBC Learning English Youtube Channel

Every cloud has a silver lining in Arabic

رُبّ ضارة نافعة: “A harmful thing may be beneficial.”
مصائب قوم عند قوم فوائد: “Some people’s adversities are beneficial to other people.”
كل تأخيرة فيها خيرة: “Every delay brings about something good.”

Every cloud has a silver lining in Basque

Bataren gaitza besteak on = lit. With an evil of one thing (or someone) another one can draw benefit. Source: Refranero Multilingüe

Every cloud has a silver lining in Catalan

D’un gran mal en surt un gran bé = lit. From a great evil comes a great good.

No hi ha mal que per bé no vingui = lit. There is no evil that doesn’t come for a a good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Croatian

Svako zlo za neko dobro = lit. every evil for some good

Every cloud has a silver lining in Czech

Vše zlé je k něčemu dobré. = lit. All bad [things] are good to something. (Every bad [thing] is good for something.)

Every cloud has a silver lining in Dutch

Achter de wolken schijnt de zon //  elke wolk heeft een zilveren voering. // altijd een geluk bij een ongeluk = lit. always lucky in an accident.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Estonian

Vihmaga saab vilja, põuaga põhku.
~ With rain comes grain, with drought (comes) hay.
Õnn ja õnnetus käivad käsikäes.
~ Happiness and unhappiness walk hand in hand.
Õnnest tuleb õnnetus ja õnnetusest õnn.
~ Out of happiness comes unhappiness and out of unhappiness (comes) happiness.
Ka kõige mustem mure kaob valge liiva all.
~ Even the darkest sorrow disappears underneath the white sand.

Every cloud has a silver lining in other languages

Every cloud has a silver lining in French

À quelque chose malheur est bon = lit. In every evil thing there is something good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in French

Every cloud has a silver lining in Galician

Non hai mal que por ben non veña = lit. There is no evil that doesn’t come for a a good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in German

Wo Schatten ist, ist auch Licht.
Where there is shadow there is also light.

Es hat allessein Gutes = lit. It has all its good

Nach düstern Wolken scheint die Sonne am stärksten = lit. behing hidden clouds the sun shines stronger.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Greek

«Ουδέν κακόν αμιγές καλού»
or in polytonic spelling (since it’s a Stoic belief, I think Epicurean):
«Οὐδὲν κακὸν ἀμιγὲς καλοῦ»
in Modern Greek pronunciation:
/u’ðen ka’kon ami’ʝes ka’lu/
lit. “There’s no evil without some good

Every cloud has a silver lining in Hebrew

הכל לטובה hakol letova – everything is for the best

Also “מעז יצא מתוק” – [me’az yatsa matok] = “out of the strong came forth sweetness”.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Hungarian

Minden rosszban van valami jó.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Irish gaelic

Tha a’ ghrian air cùlaibh gach sgothan = lit. In every bad situation there is an element of good

Every cloud has a silver lining in Italian

“Dietro ogni nuvola c’è un raggio di sole” (The sun shines behind the clouds).
“Finita la pioggia torna il sereno” (As soon as it stops raining, the sun starts shining).

“Non tutto il male viene per nuocere” – “Not all the bad things come to hurt”

Every cloud has a silver lining in Japanese

苦あれば楽あり(if there is pain, there is another gain) and 災い転じて福となす(misfortune will be transformed into fortune).

Every cloud has a silver lining in Korean

불행 중 다행-something good that comes out of something bad

Every cloud has a silver lining in Korean

Every cloud has a silver lining in Latin

Malum nullum est sine aliquo bono = There is no evil without some good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Portuguese

Há males que vêm para o/por bem. ( lit. There are bad things that come for the sake o good)

Every cloud has a silver lining in Russian

нет худа без добра /net khuda bez dobra/ – [there is] no bad without good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Swedish

Varje moln har en silverkant but it’s not a very common expression, but we usually say “Varje moln har en guldkant” – Every cloud have a gold lining.

Inget ont som inte har något gott med sig” – Nothing evil that doesn’t have something good with it.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Scottish Gaelic

Tha a’ ghrian air cùlaibh gach sgothan = literally, The sun is behind each boat.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Spanish

No hay mal que por bien no venga: There is no evil that doesn’t come for a a good.

Every cloud has a silver lining in Turkish

Her işte bir hayır vardır.” –> lit. “There is something good in everything.

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan III

British English Slang words and expressions illustrated with a touch of humour.

After Common British English expressions translated to Catalan I and Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II here is the third instalment of this series with 40 new British English slang expressions translated to Catalan (see the notes at the bottom of each meme).

Slang is a type of language consisting of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal are more common in speech than writing, even though some writers use it a lot.

Absobloodylutely

absobloodylutely british English slang words
Absobloodylutely in Catalan: oi tant; i tant!; Ja ho pots ben dir; ja hi pots pujar de peus… Even efectiviwonder.

Aggro

aggro
British English slang
British English colloquial expressions
Aggro in Catalan: Mal rotllo, brega ( “bronca”)

Airy-fairy

British English colloquial expressions
airy-fairy
Airy-fairy in Catalan = cap de pardals

All gravy

British English colloquial expressions
all gravy
All gravy in Catalan = Collonut, tot bé, tot va bé, de put* mare (the missing word is an “a”)

(to pull an) All nighter

to pull an all nighter British Slang
British English colloquial expressions
To pull an all nighter in Catalan = passar la nit en blanc. to pull an all nighter (partying) and then going to work/study = empalmar

Amazeballs

British English colloquial expressions
amazeballs
Amazeballs in Catalan = Brutal, la hòstia, que t’hi cagues.

Ankle-biter

ankle-biter 
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Ankle-biter in Catalan = marrec, menut(s), Ankle-biters = mainada

Anorak

anorak
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Anorak in Catalan: raret/a, friky

(to go) ape

to go ape
British English slang
(to) go ape in Catalan: empipar-se com una mona.

Arse

arse
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Arse in Catalan: Cul

Arse-licker (arse-kisser)

arse-licker arse kisser
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Arse-licker in Catalan = pilota, llepa-culs.
British English slang UK typical expressions

Arseholed

arseholed
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Arsholed in Catalan: Piripi

Arty-farty (Artsy)

Artsy-farty or arty 
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Artsy-farty or arty in Catalan: culturetes

(to get the) axe / ax

To get the axe 
To get the ax
British English slang words UK Colloquial
To get the axe in Catalan = fer fora; ser acomiadat

Baccy

baccy rolling tobacco
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Bacci in Catalan: paper de tabac (or tabac de liar)

Bloke

bloke
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Bloke in Catalan: paio

Bog

bog
British English slang words UK Colloquial
in Catalan: vàter

Bog roll

bog roll
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Bog roll in Catalan: Paper de vàter

Botched

botched
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Botched in Catalan: anar-se’n a la merda, en orris

Dog’s bollocks

dog's bollocks
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Dog’s bollocks in Catalan: la hòstia

Barmy

barmy
bonkers
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Similar to Bonkers. Barmy in Catalan: com un llum.
British English slang UK typical expressions

Cheesed off

cheesed off
don't get your knickers in a twist
something the cat dragged in
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Cheesed off in Catalan: ratllat/da

Chips

chips french fries
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Chips in Catalan: : patates fregides
Ricky Gervais British English Slang

Chock-a-block

chock-a-block
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Chock-a-block = crowded Chock-a-block in Catalan: de gom a gom

Chuffed

chuffed
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Chuffed = very happy, very pleased Chuffed in Catalan: Encantat

Codswallop

codswallop
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Codswallop = Bollocks. Codswallop in Catalan: Collonades

Dishy

dishy
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Dishy in Catalan: està bo; atractiu, guapo

Dodgy

dodgy
shady
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Dodgy in Catalan: xungo

Dosh

dosh
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Dosh in Catalan: Pasta

Fag

fag
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Fag = cigarette. Fag in Catalan = piti

Know your onions

know your onions
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Know your onions = saber el que et fas / saber el que et fas
British English slang UK typical expressions

Fluke

Fluke in Catalan = xamba, sort

Full of beans

full of beans
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Full of beans = pletòric, ple d’energia

Hard lines

 UK British slang
hard lines
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Hard lines in Catalan: mala sort, anar mal dades (22)
English like a native Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0Hg2Ks00kCekyjZG_LxOmg

Her majesty’s pleasure

her majesty's pleasure to spend time in prison UK British slang
British English slang words UK Colloquial
her Majesty’s pleasure in Catalan: a la garjola

(to) honk

UK British slang
honk
honking
(to) honk in Catalan = trallar, potar

Kip

kip British slang UK
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Kip in Catalan = Becaina

Mush

UK British slang
mush
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Mush in Catalan = Boca

Narked

UK British slang
narked
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Narked in Catalan: ratllat

Nitwit

nitwit
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Nitwit in Catalan: pallús, totxo

Nosh

nosh
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Nosh in Catalan = Teca
British English slang UK typical expressions England

Quid

quid
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Quid in Catalan = “peles”

Ta

Ta
British English slang words UK Colloquial
Ta in Catalan = Merci

Tocat del Bolet (Nuts) is a blog that aims to promote and share Catalan language and culture throughout its most typical expressions, in a fun and informative way.

Thank you for your attention. We look forward to your comments and questions. Nuts ~Tocat del bolet, Catalan culture crossing borders! Share this post!

Recommended posts

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan I

Common British English expressions translated to Catalan II

Most common English idioms

25 funny short jokes

Humour > short and funny jokes

25 hilarious one-liners explained

Here are some of the best one-liners we have found on the internet. We have included an explanation of each joke for those who are learning English or, no offence, just don’t get it. Most of them are puns or game on words. You can copy them and text them on whatsapp, Line, Wechat or the messaging APP you use, but please, mention us or at least keep our URL in between each joke. We hope you have fun. So, without further ado, let’s get started!

  1. When life gives you melons, you’re dyslexic.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

2. I invented a new word: plagiarism!

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

3. “Employee of the month is a good example of how somebody can be both a winner and a loser at the same time.” – Demetri Martin

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

4. Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? He’s all right now.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

5. “It’s sad that a family can be torn apart by something as simple as wild dogs.” – Jack Handey

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

6. “It became so cold in New York last night that it forced the flashers to describe themselves to people.”

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

7. Atheism is a non-prophet organisation.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

8. Did you hear about the two silk worms in a race? It ended in a tie!

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

9. I want to die peacefully in my sleep, like my grandfather.. Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

10. Thanks for explaining the word “galore” to me, it means a lot.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

11. Don’t you hate it when somebody answers their questions? I do.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

12. The future, the present and the past walked into a bar. Things got a little tense.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

13. Yesterday I accidentally swallowed some food coluoring. The doctor says I’m OK, but I feel like I’ve dyed a little inside.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

14. My girlfriend said, “You act like a detective too much. I want to split up.” “Good idea,” I replied. “We can cover more ground that way.”

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

15. I’m glad I know sign language. It’s pretty handy.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

16. Trying to write with a broken pencil is pointless.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

17. What is the best thing about living in Switzerland? Well, the flag is a big plus.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

18. I’ve decided to sell my Hoover… it was just collecting dust.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

19. I was going to share a vegetable joke but it’s corny.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

20. A guy was admitted to hospital with eight plastic horses in his stomach. His condition is stable.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

21. I hope the guy who invernted autocorrect burns in Hello!

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

22. I met the man who invented the windowsill. He’s a ledge.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

23. I was hoping to steal some leftovers from the party but my plans were foiled.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

24. Most people are shocked when they find out how bad an electrician I am.

🙂 tocatdelbolet.cat 🙂

25. What kind of murderer has moral fiber? – A cereal killer.

Explanations

  1. Melons – Lemons, from the famous sentence “If life gives you lemons, make a lemonade”.

2. Plagiarism already exists. It is the practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one’s own.

4. Game on words. All right = ok and the whole right side

5. Torn apart= To violently rip or pull someone or something into pieces. Also in a figurative sense.

6. Flaser: a man who exposes his genitals in public.

7. Game on words non-prophet organisation / non-profit organisation .

8. Game on words: tie = a piece of string, cord, or similar used for fastening or tying something and achieving the same score or ranking as another competitor or team.

10. Galore = in abundance

12. Double-meaning of the word “tense”= verb tense and tension, awkward

13. Sound dye = die and dye, colour or tint

14. (to) split up = (to) break up

15. Handy= convenient

16. Pointless = futile, aimless

17:

Flag: Switzerland on Google Android 8.0

18. Hoover = vacuum cleaner

19. Corny= trite, banal, or mawkishly sentimental.

20. Double meaning of the word “stable” = (of a patient or their medical condition) not deteriorating in health after an injury or operation and a building set apart and adapted for keeping horses.

22. Windowsill = a ledge or sill forming the bottom part of a window. Ledge is a ridge and also a shortening of the word “legend.” A legend is someone who is well-known, often for doing something great or incredible.

23. Aluminium foil and foil = prevent (something considered wrong or undesirable) from succeeding.

25. Moral fiber (AE) = integrity, moral standing fiber = grain Cereal sounds like serial

Palyndrome day: 02-02-2020

Amazing facts about language

Palyndromic numbers and the Catalan word Capicua

Today, 02-02-2020, is a palyndrome day. A palindromic number is a number that remains the same when its digits are reversed. Catalans have a special name for this type of number: capicua (pronunced [ka.piˈku.a], it means literally, “headandtail” written together).

Capicua in English, French and Spanish

Capicua in English is a Palindromic number and in French a Nombre palindrome .

Finally, the word of Catalan origin Capicua became popular in Spanish, just by adding an accent on the letter u, that is to say, Capicúa, and then the word was added to the RAE dictionary. Now capicúa is widely used in Spanish, too.

Most common English idioms

English language idioms illustrated and translated to other languages

An idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the hillat the drop of a hat ). Here is a list of the most popular idioms in English translated to other languages and illustrated, some of them with a touch of humour. Enjoy yourself!

Add insult to injury

(to) Add insult to injury = to make a bad situation even worse Catalan: according to the context, it may translate to per si no fos prou, ficar el dit a la llaga or per acabar-ho d’arrodonir/d’adobar (said ironically) French: pour couronner le tout Galician: Aínda por riba German: Salz in die Wunde streuen Spanish: Para colmo de males

(to) Add insult to injury in other languages

A little bird told me

A Little bird told me = someone gave me a piece of information about something that is supposed to be secret Catalan: Un ocellet m’ha dit… French: mon petit doigt m’a dit Spanish: Un pajarito me ha dicho.

A Little bird told me in other languages
idioms

All ears

(to be) All ears = (to) listen actively Catalan: sóc tot orelles French: tout ouïe German: Ich bin ganz Ohr Italian: tutto orecchie Portuguese: todo ouvidos Spanish: todo oídos

All ears 
idioms
All ears in other languages

An arm and a leg

(to cost) An arm and a leg = very expensive Catalan: costar un ull de la cara French: coûter les yeux de la tête German: eine Stange Geld kosten Italian: Costare un occhio della testa Spanish: Costar un riñón

to cost an arm and a leg  in other languages
idioms
idiom

A needle in a haystack

A needle in a haystack = something that is almost impossible to find because it is hidden among so many other things. Catalan: una agulla en un paller French: chercher une aiguille dans une botte de foin German: Nadel im Heuhaufen Italian: ago in un pagliaio Macedonian: и́гла во стог се́но Portuguese: agulha num palheiro Spanish: Aguja en un pajar

a needle in a haystack  in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions
This one is easy to find

A penny for your thoughts

A penny for your thoughts = used to ask someone what they are thinking about. There are no exact equivalents, but we can use these expressions in other languages to convey the same meaning: Catalan: En què penses? French: à quoi penses-tu en ce moment Spanish: ¿En qué estás pensando?

a penny for your thoughts in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions

As fit as a fiddle

A short fuse

A short fuse = have a tendency to lose one’s temper quickly, to have a short temper Catalan: ser de sang calenta French: se mettre en rogne facilement German: jähzornig sein Spanish: de sangre caliente.

a short fuse in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions

At the drop of a hat

At the drop of a hat = right away Catalan: en un tres i no-res. French: sans hésiter Galician: Axiña, decontado German: sofort, unverzüglich Italian: immediatamente, subito Portuguese: na hora Romanian: imediat, îndată Scottish Gaelic: anns a’ bhad, sa bhad, gu grad Spanish: Ipso facto

at the drop of a hat in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions
If you need help, just call me. I can come at the drop of a hat.

Bite the bullet

bite the bullet idiom
(to) bite the bullet in Catalan: fer el cor fort French: Serrer les dents, trouver le courage de faire [qch] German: die Kröte schlucken Italian: farsi cuore Portuguese: Cerrar os dentes Spanish: Hacer de tripas corazón

Brand new

BRAND NEW IDIOM
French: flambant neuf German: nagelneu, brandneu Scottish Irish: amach ón tsnáthaid, (of garment) as an bhfilleadh Spanish: recién estrenado, sin estrenar, flamante

Butterflies in my stomach

Butterflies in my stomach = to be uneasy, nervous Catalan = tenir papallones a la panxa French: avoir le trac Spanish: tener mariposas en el estómago German: Schmetterlinge im Bauch haben Spanish: mariposas en el estómago

butterflies in my stomach in other languages idiom

Back to the drawing board

Back to the drawing board = to start again or try another idea. It is similar to Back to square one or to start from scratch Catalan: sant tornem-hi French: parler pour ne rien dire German: Fangen wir noch mal von vorne an Spanish: volver a la casilla de salida

back to the drawing board in other languages
 idioms

Ball is in your court

Ball is in your court = It is up to you to make a move. Catalan: la pilota és a la teva taulada. French: la balle est dans son camp German: eine Stange Geld kosten Italian: tocca a te Spanish: la pelota está en tu tejado

Ball is in your court in other languages
idioms

Bark up the wrong tree

(to) Bark up the wrong tree = to have a wrong idea Catalan: errar el tret, anar desencaminat French: faire fausse route, se mettre le doigt dans l’œil, miser sur le mauvais cheval German: auf dem Holzweg sein Portuguese: bater à porta errada, bater na porta errada Spanish: llamar a la puerta equivocada, errar el tiro.

to bark up the wrong tree in other languages
idioms

Beat around the bush

(to) beat around the bush = to avoid talking about what is really important and instead talk about other things Catalan: anar-se’n per les branques French: tourner autour du pot German: um den heißen Brei herumreden Italian: menare il can per l’aia Spanish: andarse con rodeos

to beat around the bush in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions

Bend over backwards

(to) bend over backwards= make every effort to achieve something, especially to be helpful Catalan: fer mans i mànigues French: Se mettre en quatre German: sich ein Bein ausreißen Italian: farsi in quattro Spanish: remover cielo y tierra

to bend over backwards in other languages
idiom
idioms, English typical expressions

Bite off more than one can chew

Bite off more than one can chew = to take on a task that is way too big. Catalan: estirar més el braç que la màniga. French: Qui trop embrasse, mal étreint. Spanish: El que mucho abarca, poco aprieta German: Wer zu viel fasst, lässt viel fallen Italian: Chi troppo vuole nulla stringe. Portuguese: Quem muito abarca pouco abraça.

Blow smoke

(to) Blow smoke = (to) deliberately confuse or deceive Catalan: Marejar la perdiu French: parler pour ne rien dire German: jdm. etwas vormachen Spanish: marear la perdiz

to blow smoke in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions

Break a leg!

Break a leg! = have luck (said to actors before they go on stage) Catalan: molta merda! French: Je te dis merde! German: Hals- und Beinbruch! Italian: in bocca al lupo! Portuguese: Merda! Spanish: ¡Mucha mierda!

break a leg in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions

Bundle of nerves

Bundle of nerves = somebody who is extremely anxious or tense. Catalan: un sac de nervis Basque: Buru gabeko oiloak bezala gabiltza Gaelic Irish: bheith an-neirbhíseach French: un paquet de nerfs German: ein Bündel Nerven Italian: un fascio di nervi Portuguese: uma pilha de nervos Mandarin Chinese: 紧张不安的人 Russian: клубок нервов

to be a bundle of nerves in other languages
idioms

By the skin of your teeth

By the skin of your teeth = by a very narrow margin; only just Catalan: pels pèls French: de justesse; (colloquial) d’un poil German: mit Ach und Krach Italian: per un pelo Scottish Gaelic: air èiginn Spanish: por los pelos

by the skin of my teeth in other languages idioms

Cat got your tongue?

Cat got your tongue? = expression used to ask someone why they are not saying anything Catalan: Que se t’ha menjat la llengua el gat? Chinese: 你成了啞巴了嗎?(literally, have you become dumb?) German: Du hast wohl die Sprache verloren? Italian: Il gatto ti ha mangiato la lingua? Russian: язы́к проглоти́л? (literally, “did you swallow your tongue?”) Spanish: ¿Te ha comido la lengua el gato?

cat got your tongue in other languages idiom

(to get) Cold feet

to get cold feet idiom
to get cold feet in Catalan
to get cold feet in  French
to get cold feet in  German
to get cold feet in  Spanish
Fer-se enrere, acollonir-se (CAT); Être moins chaud pour qch (FR); kalte Füße bekommen (GE)
Echarse atrás, acojonarse (SP)

Crying wolf

Crying wolf : someone who continues asking for help when they don’t really need it, with the result that people think they don’t need help when they actually need it. Catalan: que ve el llop! Queixar-se per no-res. Plora-miques. French: crier au loup Spanish: Que viene el lobo.

Crying wolf in other languages
idioms

Cut some slack

Cut someone some slack : to give some some leeway in their conduct. Catalan: donar una mica de marge French: grappe à [qqn] (colloquial); être indulgent envers [qqn] German: mit jdm. nachsichtig sein Spanish: dar cuartelillo.

cut me some slack in other languages

Draw the line

(to) Draw the line: to set a limit on what you are willing to do or accept. Catalan: marcar una línia vermella. French: tracer un trait German: einen Trennungsstrich ziehen zwischen Spanish: poner límites

draw the line in other languages idioms

Easier said than done

Easier said than done: sth that is uncomplicated to propose, but difficult to accomplish. Catalan: més fàcil dir-ho que fer-ho French: plus facile à dire qu’à faire German: leichter gesagt als getan Portuguese: più facile a dirsi che a farsi Spanish: del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho

easier said than done in other languages
idioms

Fish out of water

Fish out of water = to feel uncomfortable in a situation Catalan: peix fora de l’aigua French: Poisson hors de l’eau German: fehl am Platz Spanish: Pez fuera del agua (SP)

fish out of water in other languages
idioms

Gift of tongues

Gift of tongues = to be gifted for languages Catalan: (tenir) Do de llengües

gift of tongues in other languages
idioms

Get goosebumps

(to) get goosebumps = the body hair stands on end as the result of an intense feeling Catalan: pell de gallina French: Avoir la chair de poule Spanish: Ponerse la piel de gallina German: Ich bekam eine Gänsehaut. (I got goosebumps) Italian: venire la pelle d’oca. Portuguese: arrepiar-se Basque: oilo-ipurdi.

get the goosebumps in other languages

Go the extra mile

(to) Go the extra mile = to make an extra effort. Catalan: fer un esforç extra. French: Se mettre en quatre German: noch einen Schritt weiter gehen Spanish: hacer un esfuerzo extra

go the extra mile in other languages
idioms

Hit the books

(to) Hit the books = to study Catalan: fer colzes French: potasser German: die Nase in die Bücher stecken Spanish: empollar; estudiar

to hit the books in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese
(to) hit the books

Hit the sack / hay / bed

(to) Hit the sack / hay / bed = go to bed Catalan: Anar a dormir, anar a clapar, a fer nones French: Se pieuter German: ins Bett gehen sich in die Falle hauen Italian: assopirsi, appisolarsi Spanish: Irse al sobre; irse a la cama

hit the bed in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Hit the nail on the head

(to) hit the nail on the head in Chinese:
Mandarin: 一針見血 (zh), 一针见血 (zh) (yīzhēnjiànxiě) (draw blood on the first prick)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Catalan: Justa la fusta (just to the whip); clavar-la (to nail it).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Czech: uhodit hřebíček na hlavičku, udeřit hřebíček na hlavičku (to hit the cloves on the head,  to hit the nail on the head).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Danish: ramme hovedet på sømmet (to  hit the head on the seam).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Dutch: de spijker op de kop slaan (to hit the nail on the head).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Finnish: osua naulan kantaan (to hit the nail on the head).
(to) hit the nail on the head in French: faire mouche (literally, to do the fly).
(to) hit the nail on the head in German: den Nagel auf den Kopf treffen ((to hit the nail on the head).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Hungarian: fején találja a szöget (hu)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Icelandic: hitta naglann á höfuðið, eiga kollgátuna, hitta í mark, koma orðum að kjarna máls, tilgreina kjarna máls
(to) hit the nail on the head in Italian: colpire nel segno (to hit the mark).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Lithuanian: durti kaip pirštu į akį (prick as finger in the eye)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Polish: trafić w sedno (to hit the nail)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Portuguese: acertar em cheio (literally, to fully hit).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Russian: попа́сть не в бровь а в глаз (popástʹ ne v brovʹ a v glaz) (hit not the brow but the eye), попа́сть в то́чку (popástʹ v tóčku) (hit the spot)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Spanish: dar en el blanco (to hit the bullseye), dar en el clavo (to hit the nail); clavarlo (to nail it)
(to) hit the nail on the head in Swedish: slå huvudet på spiken (to turn your head on the nail).
(to) hit the nail on the head in Basque: bete-betean asmatu (fully invented), erdiz erdi asmatu (half invented)

Hot potato

A hot potato = controversial issue or situation which is awkward to deal with, so everybody is trying to avoid it. Catalan: Patata calenta. French: une patate chaude German: heißes Eisen n Spanish: patata caliente

hot potato in other languages idioms expressions
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

In minute detail

In minute detail: paying careful attention to the smallest details Catalan: amb tots els ets i uts; fil per randa French: dans les moindre détails German: bis ins kleinste Detail Spanish: minuciosamente; con pelos y señales

in minute detail in other languages idiom
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

In the nick of time

In the nick of time = Just in time Catalan: just a temps French: juste-à-temps German: in der allerletzten Sekunde Portuguese: No último instante Spanish: en el último momento

in the nick of time in other languages idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

In touch

(to keep) In touch = to be in communication with someone and get up-to-date knowledge Catalan: en contacte French: être/ rester en contact German: mit jdm./etw. in Kontakt stehen Portuguese: em contacto Spanish: en contacto

keep in touch in other languages
idioms, English typical expressions
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Itchy feet

to have itchy feet idiom
to have itchy feet  in Catalan
to have itchy feet  in French
to have itchy feet  in German
to have itchy feet  in Spanish

Jump on the bandwagon

jump on the bandwagon idiom

Let bygones be bygones

Let bygones be bygones = to forget past conflicts and be reconciled. Catalan: fer creu i ratlla. French: Passer l’éponge German: die Vergangenheit ruhen lassen Irish Gaelic: an rud atá thart bíodh sé thart Spanish: pelillos a la mar

Let bygones be bygones in other languages idiom
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Like two peas in a pod

Like two peas in a pod = very similar Catalan: com dues gotes d’aigua French: Comme deux gouttes d’eau German: ein Ei dem anderen Romanian: ca două picături de apă Portuguese: cara de um, focinho de outro Spanish: como dos gotas de agua

Like two peas in a pod in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Glad to see the back of

(to be) glad to see the back of…= (to) be happy to get rid of someone . Similar to good riddance Catalan: Bon vent i barca nova French: bon débarras (fr), bon vent (fr) Italian: a mai più rivederci Spanish: a enemigo que huye, puente de plata, Anda, vete por ahi

glad to see the back of someone in other languages 
idiom
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Not my cup of tea

(It is) Not my cup of tea: used to refer to something that yu don’t like or are not interested in Catalan: No em fa el pes, No és sant de la meva devoció. Chinese (Mandarin):  不是我的菜 (literally, This is not my dish) Czech:  不是我的菜 (literally, This is not my dish). French: C’est (pas) mon truc (literally, it’s not my thing), to say that you don’t like something. The familiar C’est (pas) mon délire (literally, It’s not my delirium) works as well in circles of young friends. Another familiar expression is C’est (pas) mon dada (literally, It’s not my hobby) German: Das ist nicht mein Ding (literally, It is not my thing) Italian: Non è il mio genere (literally, It is not my genre) Japanese: 好みではない (pronounced Konomide wanai, literally, It doesn´t enter my ki) Malay: Bukan bidang aku la (literally, not my field) (Brazilian) Portuguese: Não é minha praia (literally, this is not my beach) Russian:  Это не моё / Это не в моём вкусе, pronounced Eto ne moyo / Eto ne v moyom vkuse (Literally: It’s not mine / It’s not to my liking). Spanish: No es santo de mi devotión (literally, He is not a saint of my devotion)

It is not my cup of tea in other languages
 idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Once in a blue moon

Once in a blue moon = very rarely Catalan: Molt de tant en tant German: alle Jubeljahre einmal French: tous les trente-six du mois German: alle Jubeljahre einmal Spanish: Raras veces, cada muerte de obispo.

Once in a blue moon in other languages
 idiom
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

On the ball

(to be) On the ball = to be alert, focused Catalan: Estar al cas , alerta French: être éveillé(e), être vif (vive) German: am Ball sein Spanish: estar al loro

to be on the ball idiom in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

To have other fish to fry

to have other fish to fry idiom

Out of the blue

out of the blue idiom

Piece of cake

Piece of cake = very easy Catalan: és bufar i fer ampolles, està tirat, està xupat German: Kinderspiel, Pillepalle, ein Klacks Italian: gioco da ragazzi, una cosa da niente, come bere un bicchier d’acqua, gioco da bambini Portuguese: ser molezaSpanish: está chupado, coser y cantar

piece of cake in other languages 
idiom 
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Put my two cents

(to) put my two cents / (to) put in my two-penny worth used to preface a tentative statement of one’s opinion Catalan: dir la meva/seva/nostra/vostra French: mes deux cents (my two cents), grain de sel German: seinen Senf dazugeben Spanish: decir algo

put my two cents in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Rain buckets

(to) rain buckets, also (to) rain cats and dogs (old-fashioned)= (to) rain heavily Catalan: Ploure a bots i barrals French: pleuvoir des cordes, pleuvoir à verse, pleuvoir des hallebardes, pleuvoir comme vache qui pisse, (Québec) pleuvoir à boire debout, (Belgium) dracher German: German: Bindfäden regnen, in Strömen regnen, aus allen Kannen gießen, aus allen Kannen schütten, es schüttet wie aus Eimern Italian: piovere a catinelle, diluviare, scrosciare, piovere come Dio la manda Portuguese: o céu vir abaixo, chover a cântaros (pt) (Portugal), chover a potes (Portugal), cair um toró (Brazil), chover canivetes (Brazil) Spanish: llover a cántaros Welsh: bwrw hen wragedd â ffyn

rain buckets in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

There is no silver bullet

French: Il n’y a pas de solution miracle Spanish: No hay solución milagrosa

Sit on the fence

(to) sit on the fence = avoid making decisions or choices; remain neutral Catalan: No decidir-se, ser equidistant, no mullar-se French: ménager la chèvre et le chou German: zwischen den Fronten stehen Portuguese: em cima do muro Spanish: estar indeciso, no mojarse

to sit on the fence in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Steal one’s thunder

(to) steal one’s thunder = To appropriate someone’s ideas, typically in order to be more popular. Catalan: atribuir-se el mèrit French: s’attribuer les mérites Spanish: atribuirse el mérito

steal my thunder
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Take it easy

(to) Take it easy = Calm down, keep your hair on Catalan: (pren-t’ho amb) calma, tranki Chinese (Mandarin): 休息 (zh) (xiūxi) Galician: relaxar German: sich entspannen Portuguese: sossegar Russian: расслабля́ться (ru) impf (rasslabljátʹsja), рассла́биться (ru) pf (rasslábitʹsja) Scottish Gaelic: gabh socair Spanish: (tómatelo con) calma, tranquilo/a, tranki

take it easy in other languages
 idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Under the weather

Under the weather = slightly unwell or in low spirits. Catalan: estar moix , no estar fi/na French: ne pas être dans son assiette Galician: indisposto German: angeschlagen Italian: indisposto Spanish: indispuesto, pachucho.

under the weather in other languages
idioms
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Up in the air

Up in the air = still to be settled Catalan: en l’aire, el més calent és a l’aigüerta French: être assez vague German: Es ist alles noch offen (literally, Everything is still open) Spanish: en el aire

Up in the air in other languages
idiom
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

Walk on eggshells

(to) walk on eggshells: (to) be extremely cautious about one’s words or actions Catalan: Anar amb peus de plom French: Marcher sur des œufs German: wie auf Eiern gehen Spanish: Andarse con cuidado

to walk on eggshells in other languages
idioms
typical expressions
English language
English idioms in Catalan
English idioms in Spanish
English idioms in French
English idioms in German
English idioms in Italian
English idioms in Portuguese

When pigs fly

When pigs fly: Referencing the unlikelihood that something will ever happen Catalan: Quan les gallines pixin French: Quand les poules auront des dents German: wenn Ostern und Pfingsten auf einen Tag fallen (de) (literally “when Easter and Pentecost fall on the same day”) Italian: quando gli asini voleranno (literally “when donkeys fly”), alle calende greche (literally “on the Greek calends”) Russian: когда́ рак на горе́ сви́стнет (ru) (kogdá rak na goré svístnet, literally “when a crayfish whistles on the mountain”) Spanish: cuando las vacas vuelen; cuando las ranas críen pelo.

when pigs fly in other languages

This post will be regularly updated with new idioms.

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